Police Brutality in the US

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Police Brutality in the US

Postby Corsair » Wed Apr 08, 2015 8:49 pm

The Police Are America's Terrorists

Last Saturday, Walter Scott was driving his Mercedes in North Charleston, S.C., when he was pulled over by police officer Michael Slager for driving with a broken taillight. Scott had a complicated life, as many of us do. He was employed and engaged; he owed back child support; in all likelihood he really didn’t want to go to jail. When Slager approached, Scott ran.

There is video of what happened next. Our first clear view is of Scott twisting his doughy body away and moving—half-sprinting, half-waddling—from Slager through an abandoned, grassy lot. Initially, the scene is almost comical. Scott's legs have 50 years' worth of wear on them, and appear to have but 50 yards' worth of running in them. For a brief moment, the video takes on a familiar quality, like something from an episode of Cops. Instead of pursuing, though, Slager, 33, draws his handgun and fires seven times. After a pregnant pause, Slager shoots once more. Around 30—less? more?—feet into his desperate dash, Scott falls to his knees, and then onto his belly, and sprawls facedown beneath a tree.

Only then does Slager move again, walking toward Scott.

“Put your hands behind your back now!” he orders. Scott doesn’t comply. When the officer gets to the body, he handcuffs Scott’s arms behind his back, then stands up, like he’s forgotten something. He first walks, then jogs back to the spot from where he shot, and picks an object off the ground. As a second officer approaches Scott, speaking into his walkie-talkie for a medical kit, Slager ambles back over, then drops the object on the ground next to the dead man.

"This just doesn't sound right," Scott's surviving brother, Anthony, would later say. "How do you lose your life at a traffic stop?"

On Tuesday, Slager was charged with murder after a cell-phone video of Scott's death was released. Thanks to technology and chance, we now know a lot about Scott's final seconds. He was executed. It's right here:



For as long as there have been white people and black people and brown people in America, white people have slaughtered black people and brown people. Over the years, the techniques have changed slightly, even as they've bled into each other. Slavery was slaughter, just as hanging and dragging are beating and hacking are slaughter, just as electrocuting and poisoning and shooting are slaughter. But whatever the method, whites have slaughtered minorities, and there is no reason to think they won't continue to do so.

The killings of minorities by police are instructive in this regard, not because all policemen are violent racists or murderers (the vast majority are neither) or because they are personally responsible for killing large or even necessarily disproportionate numbers of black and brown people (they aren't), but because they are agents of the state, and so their actions, and the consequences they face, serve as a sort of index of the public will.

We know things about this sort of killing. Last year, ProPublica published a study concluding that black teenage boys are 21 times more likely to be killed by police than their white peers. (The findings have since been debated, but all agree that the disparity is enormous.) Mapping Police Violence reports that in March, 36 black people—one every 21 hours—were killed by cops. In big towns and small towns and cities across the nation, minorities are being killed by the very men and women sworn to protect and to serve them.

Police have the latitude to kill citizens, and are only rarely convicted of any wrongdoing for doing so. In South Carolina alone, where Slager killed Scott, officers have shot at citizens on at least 210 occasions over the last five years without a single one being convicted of breaking a law. It's a victory in itself that Slager was charged with murder, but he was only charged after video was uncovered of the officer shooting a black man in the back.

And that's important, too: the video. Thanks to technological advances, there's an entire grisly genre of police officers shooting and often killing unarmed people of color—usually men—that's just as available and accessible as porn and puppy videos. We bear witness to cops blowing away people who look like us.

Here's Antonio Zambrano-Montes, 35, being shot to death in Pasco, Wa. on Feb. 10:



Here's 12-year-old Tamir Rice being shot to death in Cleveland, Oh. on Nov. 22:



Here's LaVer Jones, 35, being shot in the hip at a gas station in Columbia, South Carolina on Sept. 25:



Here's video from Wal-Mart surveillance cameras of John Crawford, 22, being shot to death in Beavercreek, Oh. on Aug. 5:



Here's Eric Garner, 43, being choked to death in Staten Island, New York on July 17:



Witnessing all these shootings and killings creates a constant state of terror within minorities, not altogether different from the effect larger populations feel witnessing passenger planes flying into buildings, or gunmen cutting their way through schools and shopping malls, or children blowing themselves up in cramped bazaars. The issue doesn't involve absolute numbers; it involves the effect of knowing that at any time, your number could come up.

The difference is that when the Boston Marathon is bombed, or people fly planes into buildings, or an aggrieved loner goes on a killing spree, we, as a society, pursue justice to the very ends of the earth, if only to sleep better at night. When killer cops rarely, if ever, even step foot in court, let alone get convicted, the absence of immediate justice or punishment leads to an unaddressed fear. It's a fear of ubiquity; a fear that the carnage can be easily replicated, virtually anywhere, by virtually anyone; a fear that our lives don't matter.

This fear is a virus that eats its way through a population, because the affected people despair, resigned to the fact that they're dehumanized and that there's a decent chance that nothing they do or have done even matters. It doesn't matter that Scott had just reunited with his brother, or that he liked to dance, or that he was getting engaged, just as it doesn't matter that you're someone's mother, or someone's son, or went to college, or have a career, or a gaggle of loving friends, or a sweet tooth. Your very essence is stripped until you're no more than a demon in baggy shorts, a shadow beneath a hoodie, a slab of brown skin.

Police do lots of things; much and maybe most of it laudable. One thing they do consistently and consistently well is engage in what amounts to state-sanctioned terrorism against American citizens, paid for by American tax dollars.

So why do we allow it?

Before anyone but Slager and his secret videographer knew just what had left Scott lifeless, South Carolina's Post and Courier led an article on the incident with this:

A North Charleston police officer felt threatened last weekend when the driver he had stopped for a broken brake light tried to overpower him and take his Taser.

That's why Patrolman 1st Class Michael Thomas Slager, a former Coast Guardsman, fatally shot the man, the officer's attorney said Monday.

Slager thinks he properly followed all procedures and policies before resorting to deadly force, lawyer David Aylor said in a statement.

Later in the piece, the reporter contrasted the two men:

[Scott] has been arrested about 10 times in his lifetime, mostly for failure to appear for court hearings and to pay child support.

The only indicator of violence in his past came with his first arrest in 1987 on an assault and battery charge.

Slager, 33, served honorably in the military before joining the North Charleston Police Department more than five years ago, Aylor said.

He has never been disciplined during his time on the force, the attorney added.

Then the video of the killing surfaced. Slager's lawyer, David Aylor, announced today that he would not represent the officer. This afternoon, Slager was fired from the force. A Slager defense fund was rejected by GoFundMe, only to be picked up by Indiegogo. As of this publishing, less than $200 has been raised.

It certainly feels like maybe, this time, an officer will have to answer for the murder of a citizen. If so, it will be a rarity. There's a reason so few of the policemen who kill are punished, just as there's a reason why Darren Wilson, Daniel Pantaleo, and even neighborhood watchman George Zimmerman were exalted by many as heroes after killing unarmed minorities.

These aren't rogue agents, committing senseless crimes. They're bullets, fired from guns whose triggers other people pulled.

And this, most of all, is why a continual and ongoing if statistically rare type of slaughter qualifies as a kind of terrorism. The actions of police represent the will of the government; the will of the government represents the will of the people; the actions of police, it follows, are the embodiment of political opinion. We can talk about Michael Slager, but he was, if almost certainly unwittingly, a too. The issue is who wields him.

As long as there have been white people and black people and brown people in America, the slaughter of black and brown people has been used as a form of control. For centuries, on a population level, the racial majority has voted and lobbied to give agents of the state more power to act without sanction, to militarize, to kill. Functionally, this has enabled them to wage war on behalf of the majority of the public; to express hatred and fear and aspire to power through campaigns of terror and carnage.

The slaughter of black and brown people is, in this light, a political act, political violence enacted for political purpose enacted against a civilian population to raise fear and obtaining compliance. That Slager probably never thought of things in these terms doesn't matter; what does is that he was trained and given incentives in line with the interests of a particular class intent on preserving its power. The violence he enacted is a kind that keeps one class of citizens terrorized and fearful of random violence for the benefit of another. It's meant to keep that class in line and intact, even as the sands of time shift and racial minorities slowly crawl toward majority status. It's little different from what we see in India, or Israel and Palestine, or Ireland—a dominant class using the instruments of power against a subjugated one.

It is, in essence, the final expression of an idea. Unlike people, ideas are impossible to kill.


Source
Last edited by Corsair on Wed Apr 08, 2015 9:20 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Police Brutality in the US

Postby Zarniwoop » Wed Apr 08, 2015 9:14 pm

V is that you?
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Re: Police Brutality in the US

Postby Ken Carson » Thu Apr 09, 2015 6:12 am

All cops are bad. We get it. Just like all Arabs are terrorists, all black guys are philandering thieves, and all white people are racists.
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Re: Police Brutality in the US

Postby Wenchy » Thu Apr 09, 2015 7:02 am

That particular incident was not a racial thing, it was a bad cop thing. He would probably have done the same thing if the runner had been white. Just like there are terrible human beings in the general population, there are bad cops--though not all are that way. This is what happens when people abuse power and position and basically feel they have no accountability or repercussions for their actions.
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Re: Police Brutality in the US

Postby Jonny » Thu Apr 09, 2015 8:20 am

Ken Carson wrote:All cops are bad. We get it. Just like all Arabs are terrorists, all black guys are philandering thieves, and all white people are racists.


Generalizing is definitely bad. But for long, some of these cops who display sadistic tendencies have gotten away. I don't think these kind of cops are an insignificant minority. These are the guys who rely on our money to protect us, and I personally expect 100% of them to behave morally at all times, even on days when they've brought baggage from family to work. There are hundreds of videos on YT where random guys get swatted for silly/trivial reasons. In almost all of these instances you will feel that these mofos enjoy being a bully.
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Re: Police Brutality in the US

Postby PrimeMinister » Thu Apr 09, 2015 8:24 am

I would never argue that all cops are bad.

I will however say it is hard to argue for the "good cops" when so often they protect the bad cops via the blue wall of silence. Why would a cop protect the bad ones and thus allow this brutality to continue?
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Re: Police Brutality in the US

Postby Buc2 » Thu Apr 09, 2015 1:49 pm

PrimeMinister wrote:I would never argue that all cops are bad.

I will however say it is hard to argue for the "good cops" when so often they protect the bad cops via the blue wall of silence. Why would a cop protect the bad ones and thus allow this brutality to continue?


Fear for their own safety/repercussions/etc. should they break that blue wall?
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Re: Police Brutality in the US

Postby uscbucsfan » Thu Apr 09, 2015 3:48 pm

It's ridiculous that the video of the North Charleston police officer murdering Scott creates some sort of justification for those who believe Darren Wilson was guilty of murder. The cases have nothing to do with each other and the circumstances are completely different.
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Re: Police Brutality in the US

Postby Jonny » Thu Apr 09, 2015 6:08 pm

uscbucsfan wrote:It's ridiculous that the video of the North Charleston police officer murdering Scott creates some sort of justification for those who believe Darren Wilson was guilty of murder. The cases have nothing to do with each other and the circumstances are completely different.


That tactic is the standard operating procedure of the far left media. I was assuming the source of that article was Mother Jones, but it turned out to be Deadspin. I was close.
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Re: Police Brutality in the US

Postby MJW » Fri Apr 10, 2015 5:11 am

If you switch "liberal" for "conservative" and "Muslim" for "Cop," you can just recycle most of the arguments we've been hearing about the terrorists.
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Re: Police Brutality in the US

Postby Ken Carson » Fri Apr 10, 2015 9:05 am

Jonny wrote:Generalizing is definitely bad. But for long, some of these cops who display sadistic tendencies have gotten away. I don't think these kind of cops are an insignificant minority. These are the guys who rely on our money to protect us, and I personally expect 100% of them to behave morally at all times, even on days when they've brought baggage from family to work. There are hundreds of videos on YT where random guys get swatted for silly/trivial reasons. In almost all of these instances you will feel that these mofos enjoy being a bully.

In this instance, the guy is charged with murder. Not sure what else anyone wants. There are hundreds of thousands of people in law enforcement. Even if 99.99% percent of them are stand-up members of the community, that's a couple thousand cops who aren't.

I'm all for holding those guys accountable, but Corsair is on a crusade against cops in general, which includes a lot of good people who do a lot of dangerous work in dangerous places and they don't need any more static. In the last 2+ years, 132 police officers were shot and killed in the line of duty. In St. Petersburg (where my friend works), we had three cops murdered in less than a month a couple years back. My friend has been fired upon twice and had a third suspect draw a weapon. He had to shoot all three, and he was taken off duty for 4 months to be investigated each time. It's not like every department in the country is hunting down civilians as Corsair's fearmongering would like to inform you.
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Re: Police Brutality in the US

Postby uscbucsfan » Fri Apr 10, 2015 9:44 am

While I think the Scott case here in SC is terrible, the fact is Scott is not innocent in any facet. It was a simple traffic stop, which knowing he had a warrant, got out of his car and ran away. Not at all a reason to shoot someone at all, but the "Blacklivesmatter" campaign never takes into account most of the time the individuals who are suffering from either real or fake Police brutality are mostly bringing it upon themselves by not following the law. I know this is not true in all cases, but it has been for all the major cases; Garner, Scott, and Brown. It's a vicious cycle. Black men are more violent/disrespectful towards police officers, mostly because of how they are targeted, but this gives credence to more targeting and escalates situations. Both sides are in the wrong and need to change.

I can't see a logical starting point where that is going to happen.
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Re: Police Brutality in the US

Postby Grim Reaper » Fri Apr 10, 2015 12:21 pm

This is great - whenever I need cheering up, I can come here and read the OP's post...
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Re: Police Brutality in the US

Postby RedLeader » Fri Apr 10, 2015 2:04 pm

Ken Carson wrote:
Jonny wrote:Generalizing is definitely bad. But for long, some of these cops who display sadistic tendencies have gotten away. I don't think these kind of cops are an insignificant minority. These are the guys who rely on our money to protect us, and I personally expect 100% of them to behave morally at all times, even on days when they've brought baggage from family to work. There are hundreds of videos on YT where random guys get swatted for silly/trivial reasons. In almost all of these instances you will feel that these mofos enjoy being a bully.

In this instance, the guy is charged with murder. Not sure what else anyone wants. There are hundreds of thousands of people in law enforcement. Even if 99.99% percent of them are stand-up members of the community, that's a couple thousand cops who aren't.

I'm all for holding those guys accountable, but Corsair is on a crusade against cops in general, which includes a lot of good people who do a lot of dangerous work in dangerous places and they don't need any more static. In the last 2+ years, 132 police officers were shot and killed in the line of duty. In St. Petersburg (where my friend works), we had three cops murdered in less than a month a couple years back. My friend has been fired upon twice and had a third suspect draw a weapon. He had to shoot all three, and he was taken off duty for 4 months to be investigated each time. It's not like every department in the country is hunting down civilians as Corsair's fearmongering would like to inform you.


Pretty much this.
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Re: Police Brutality in the US

Postby Shadowhawk » Sat Apr 11, 2015 5:24 am

Buc2 wrote:
PrimeMinister wrote:I would never argue that all cops are bad.

I will however say it is hard to argue for the "good cops" when so often they protect the bad cops via the blue wall of silence. Why would a cop protect the bad ones and thus allow this brutality to continue?


Fear for their own safety/repercussions/etc. should they break that blue wall?


The fact that they have that fear only furthers his argument. Right?
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Re: Police Brutality in the US

Postby MJW » Sat Apr 11, 2015 6:34 am

uscbucsfan wrote:While I think the Scott case here in SC is terrible, the fact is Scott is not innocent in any facet. It was a simple traffic stop, which knowing he had a warrant, got out of his car and ran away. Not at all a reason to shoot someone at all, but the "Blacklivesmatter" campaign never takes into account most of the time the individuals who are suffering from either real or fake Police brutality are mostly bringing it upon themselves by not following the law. I know this is not true in all cases, but it has been for all the major cases; Garner, Scott, and Brown. It's a vicious cycle. Black men are more violent/disrespectful towards police officers, mostly because of how they are targeted, but this gives credence to more targeting and escalates situations. Both sides are in the wrong and need to change.

I can't see a logical starting point where that is going to happen.


Anytime someone says, "If you don't want to get shot, you should respect authority," I think of that uppity bitch Anne Frank. We all know the Jews are bringing it on themselves by being violent/disrespectful towards SS, mostly because of how they are targeted. It's fair to say both sides are wrong and need to change.
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Re: Police Brutality in the US

Postby MJW » Sat Apr 11, 2015 6:48 am

PrimeMinister wrote:I would never argue that all cops are bad.

I will however say it is hard to argue for the "good cops" when so often they protect the bad cops via the blue wall of silence. Why would a cop protect the bad ones and thus allow this brutality to continue?


Because the idea that the police are loyal to the citizens they've sworn to protect is garbage. They're loyal to each other first and foremost, which is probably true of people in MOST closely-knit groups. It's human nature. But don't take the damn oath - and the grab the power that comes with it - if you don't mean it.
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Re: Police Brutality in the US

Postby RedLeader » Sat Apr 11, 2015 7:43 am

MJW wrote:
PrimeMinister wrote:I would never argue that all cops are bad.

I will however say it is hard to argue for the "good cops" when so often they protect the bad cops via the blue wall of silence. Why would a cop protect the bad ones and thus allow this brutality to continue?


Because the idea that the police are loyal to the citizens they've sworn to protect is garbage. They're loyal to each other first and foremost, which is probably true of people in MOST closely-knit groups. It's human nature. But don't take the damn oath - and the grab the power that comes with it - if you don't mean it.


I believe most cops go in with the best intentions... But are quickly hardened by the reality of the streets and the people they swore to protect.


Anyway, this all goes away once the precogs are located.
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Re: Police Brutality in the US

Postby The Outsider » Sat Apr 11, 2015 1:27 pm

The fact is that the "protect and serve" line is bull. At no point do officers take that vow. Their job is to prevent crimes and, failing that, investigate crimes that have already happened.

I don't ever trust a cop who is questioning me or otherwise interested in me or my actions simply because they aren't there to help me. That isn't their job.
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Re: Police Brutality in the US

Postby PrimeMinister » Sat Apr 11, 2015 8:11 pm

MJW wrote:
PrimeMinister wrote:I would never argue that all cops are bad.

I will however say it is hard to argue for the "good cops" when so often they protect the bad cops via the blue wall of silence. Why would a cop protect the bad ones and thus allow this brutality to continue?


Because the idea that the police are loyal to the citizens they've sworn to protect is garbage. They're loyal to each other first and foremost, which is probably true of people in MOST closely-knit groups. It's human nature. But don't take the damn oath - and the grab the power that comes with it - if you don't mean it.


Agreed.

My frustration is that cops are given authority and power often without accountability. This is a recipe for human nature to do what it naturally does (historically): use power corruptly. It seems like as a nation we have for years just assumed the goodness of the police officer to "uphold the law" against the evil criminals while forgetting cops are human and need oversight just like the public.
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Re: Police Brutality in the US

Postby uscbucsfan » Sat Apr 11, 2015 8:59 pm

MJW wrote:
uscbucsfan wrote:While I think the Scott case here in SC is terrible, the fact is Scott is not innocent in any facet. It was a simple traffic stop, which knowing he had a warrant, got out of his car and ran away. Not at all a reason to shoot someone at all, but the "Blacklivesmatter" campaign never takes into account most of the time the individuals who are suffering from either real or fake Police brutality are mostly bringing it upon themselves by not following the law. I know this is not true in all cases, but it has been for all the major cases; Garner, Scott, and Brown. It's a vicious cycle. Black men are more violent/disrespectful towards police officers, mostly because of how they are targeted, but this gives credence to more targeting and escalates situations. Both sides are in the wrong and need to change.

I can't see a logical starting point where that is going to happen.


Anytime someone says, "If you don't want to get shot, you should respect authority," I think of that uppity bitch Anne Frank. We all know the Jews are bringing it on themselves by being violent/disrespectful towards SS, mostly because of how they are targeted. It's fair to say both sides are wrong and need to change.


This is a ridiculous stretch, but I'm not surprised. The summary of what I said is not at all, "If you don't want to get shot, you should respect authority". There is a culture in lower economic classes and predominately black areas, like in Charleston, to be more violent and disrespectful to police. This creates fear, anger, resentment, and general negativity which lead to quicker reactions and more rapid escalation up the use of force spectrum when dealing with said groups from law enforcement. Like I said, it's a vicious cycle.

In bad areas where people are committing crimes, violent and non-violent, where LEOs are dispatched more often, their safety is at risk. As many have alluded to, being an LEO is a job, and at the end of the day these men and women want to come home. They don't want situations like Joseph J. Matuskovic, a Charleston Deputy who was responding to a loud noise complaint and was shot and killed at the door he simply knocked on to investigate. Every day individuals fight, run, and try to kill LEOs and it's getting worse, it's not outlandish that the rate that LEOs are over aggressively using force at a higher rate.

It's easy for people to play Monday Morning QB while watching CNN and say, "That Police officer should have used a taser", "That cop should have never shot that man", "Why would he do that", but not enough people are questioning the other side. Is it ok to run from a simple traffic stop? Is it ok to punch an LEO in the face and try to take their weapon? Is it ok to shoot an assault rifle through a door when you hear an LEO is at your door?

For most rational people if an LEO says stop, you stop. If they want to apprehend you, you don't fight them...you get a lawyer(appointed for free if you cannot afford one)

After Ferguson, there were 3 LEOs(maybe more) assassinated for Michael Brown. Their message was "black lives matter". I can't think of a worse way to prevent an LEO killing an innocent(in their minds) black man than that.

Both sides are shaping their relations with the other. It's getting worse...

edit: This isn't referring to the Scott case, as the officer that killed him was completely in the wrong and appears to have simply lost his mind(he's on suicide watch). It's about the entire message created by the media that Police are a group of racist terrorist.
Last edited by uscbucsfan on Sat Apr 11, 2015 9:12 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Police Brutality in the US

Postby uscbucsfan » Sat Apr 11, 2015 9:10 pm

I heard a reporter/hack on CNN say that America may be better if we didn't have a Police force. This was just too ridiculous to even fathom. Our society would completely crumble.
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Re: Police Brutality in the US

Postby PrimeMinister » Sat Apr 11, 2015 9:52 pm

uscbucsfan wrote:I heard a reporter/hack on CNN say that America may be better if we didn't have a Police force. This was just too ridiculous to even fathom. Our society would completely crumble.


I didn't want to quote your large post but I read it and understand your point.

Here is my issue with that though. Of the two groups (Police and Public) one is supposed to be held to a higher standard than the other. There is a reason we are supposed to call police when disagreements between Jim and Joe Public arise and it is not so they can respond like Joe Public might. The police are supposed to be the cooler heads in chaos. This is why they go through training and Joe Public does not.

On 9/11 and several other days we take moments to honor our civil servants who risk their lives and sometimes lose them in service to the public. The reason these people are deserving of honor is because they often set aside personal safety for the good of Joe Public. This is honorable. Yet, when they commit a crime or make a deadly mistake the argument reverts to "Well, Joe Public has issues as well..." NO CRAP lol. That is WHY we have a police force. You cannot compare the police force with the public and say "They are both making it worse". Only one of them signed up to do the honorable job of keeping the peace and keeping a cool head in chaos. They should never be compared to the public. What if fire fighters just said "Well, I am not going in the because I could get burned" or soldiers said "I'm not obeying because I could get killed".

They should be held to a higher standard than Joe Public just as they are given greater authority & power than Joe Public.
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Re: Police Brutality in the US

Postby uscbucsfan » Sat Apr 11, 2015 10:21 pm

PrimeMinister wrote:
uscbucsfan wrote:I heard a reporter/hack on CNN say that America may be better if we didn't have a Police force. This was just too ridiculous to even fathom. Our society would completely crumble.


I didn't want to quote your large post but I read it and understand your point.

Here is my issue with that though. Of the two groups (Police and Public) one is supposed to be held to a higher standard than the other. There is a reason we are supposed to call police when disagreements between Jim and Joe Public arise and it is not so they can respond like Joe Public might. The police are supposed to be the cooler heads in chaos. This is why they go through training and Joe Public does not.

On 9/11 and several other days we take moments to honor our civil servants who risk their lives and sometimes lose them in service to the public. The reason these people are deserving of honor is because they often set aside personal safety for the good of Joe Public. This is honorable. Yet, when they commit a crime or make a deadly mistake the argument reverts to "Well, Joe Public has issues as well..." NO CRAP lol. That is WHY we have a police force. You cannot compare the police force with the public and say "They are both making it worse". Only one of them signed up to do the honorable job of keeping the peace and keeping a cool head in chaos. They should never be compared to the public. What if fire fighters just said "Well, I am not going in the because I could get burned" or soldiers said "I'm not obeying because I could get killed".

They should be held to a higher standard than Joe Public just as they are given greater authority & power than Joe Public.


I'm not saying they shouldn't be held to a higher standard. I'm not saying that if they ever over step their boundaries they shouldn't be punished aggressively. Slager deserves to be tried for murder, which I doubt he'll be convicted of murder 1, but he will get a serious charge. I'm saying that this is a natural progression created by both sides. It's extremely nice and idealistic to say that, "Joe Public" is trying to fight you and kill you, but they need to be treated like any upstanding citizen. That's not reality and it never will be.

In the military when soldiers enter areas where there have been ambushes or IEDs, they are more tense and would be quicker to react to anything. It's the same with LEOs. There will never be anything we can do to stop that. The fact is they want to live and they have a job to do. Their job is mostly to investigate crimes and prevent future crimes. Sometimes their job creates a situation where their life is in danger...they approach these cases differently in order to maintain an upper hand, because they want to finish their job and live.

They swore an oath, they are investigated, questioned, and trained better than most military branches and their job is arguably more dangerous on the average.

On the whole LEOs are good and do follow/uphold the law. There are over 700,000 LEOs in America and there are around 400 people are killed on average by LEOs each year. Even if you were the most ridiculous pessimistic LEO hater and said all 400 people killed by LEOs were unjustified. That's a ridiculously percentage.
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Re: Police Brutality in the US

Postby Deuce » Sat Apr 11, 2015 11:32 pm

Ken Carson wrote:All cops are bad. We get it. Just like all Arabs are terrorists, all black guys are philandering thieves, and all white people are racists.


This is the worst argument...ever. Ok, so 99% of Muslims/Arabs aren't terrorists. The 1% that are is still higher than any other group. Ok, 99% of cops are good cops. The 1% that aren't still need to be fixed. Ooooh but let's make sure we don't judge any groups, we might hurt someone's feelings!
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Re: Police Brutality in the US

Postby Ken Carson » Mon Apr 13, 2015 7:57 pm

Deuce wrote:
Ken Carson wrote:All cops are bad. We get it. Just like all Arabs are terrorists, all black guys are philandering thieves, and all white people are racists.


This is the worst argument...ever. Ok, so 99% of Muslims/Arabs aren't terrorists. The 1% that are is still higher than any other group. Ok, 99% of cops are good cops. The 1% that aren't still need to be fixed. Ooooh but let's make sure we don't judge any groups, we might hurt someone's feelings!


You miss the point completely. If 1% of Arabs are terrorists, we shouldn't act like 100% of them are. We should deal with each individual on a case by case basis. The same applies to cops.
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Re: Police Brutality in the US

Postby Corsair » Mon Apr 27, 2015 9:18 pm

Grim Reaper wrote:This is great - whenever I need cheering up, I can come here and read the OP's post...

Well, I suppose that the goings on in Baltimore have you just giddy from head to toe.

That's right, kids. For those of you keeping score, apparently there are another group of police officers who are responsible for another death of an innocent man.

No way this is a systemic problem though, right?
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Re: Police Brutality in the US

Postby uscbucsfan » Mon Apr 27, 2015 10:34 pm

Corsair wrote:
Grim Reaper wrote:This is great - whenever I need cheering up, I can come here and read the OP's post...

Well, I suppose that the goings on in Baltimore have you just giddy from head to toe.

That's right, kids. For those of you keeping score, apparently there are another group of police officers who are responsible for another death of an innocent man.

No way this is a systemic problem though, right?

Police should never tackle someone who runs from them...

I guess innocent is a subjective term.
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Re: Police Brutality in the US

Postby Ken Carson » Mon Apr 27, 2015 11:12 pm

Corsair wrote:
That's right, kids. For those of you keeping score, apparently there are another group of police officers who are responsible for another death of an innocent man.


Very interested to hear the details on this. The way that people like you have stirred up the good citizens of Baltimore would be pretty damn irresponsible otherwise.
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Re: Police Brutality in the US

Postby BigIrv9 » Tue Apr 28, 2015 9:02 am

It's sad. We have cops killing innocent youth and young people killing innocent cops. All the while, rappers make songs about killing cops, police forces protect their own, and media personalities and politicians stir up the people. People are frustrated, confused, hurt; lashing out like an abandoned dog. Who do we blame? What do we blame?

There's a lot of blame to go around. It's hard to see when you've taken one side and ignored all the others. It's wrong that police officers automatically view black people as criminals. It's wrong that black people automatically see police officers as murderers.

I believe King Solomon put it best in Ecclesiasties 1:14, "I have seen all the works that are done under the sun; and, behold, all is vanity and vexation of spirit."

The problem is a sin problem. We live in a broken world. The broken creature looks for solutions in his own broken world. There is nothing new under the sun. The problems we face now, our ancestors faced hundreds and thousands of years ago.

"Because the creature itself also shall be delivered from the bondage of corruption into the glorious liberty of the children of God.

For we know that the whole creation groaneth and travaileth in pain together until now.

And not only they , but ourselves also, which have the firstfruits of the Spirit, even we ourselves groan within ourselves, waiting for the adoption, to wit , the redemption of our body." -Romans 8:21-23

People are searching for something better. They're searching for they know not what. They desire love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, gentleness, and self-control. Yet, we can't even conquer our own demons. How can we conquer the demons of the world?

There is one mediator between God and man. His name is Jesus Christ. If anyone is in Christ, he is a new creation. Old things are passed away. Christ is the hope of glory. He is our light and our salvation, whom shall we fear?

"For all have sinned, and come short of the glory of God;" "But God commendeth his love toward us, in that, while we were yet sinners, Christ died for us." Romans 3:23 & 5:8
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