The Robots Are Coming

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Re: The Robots Are Coming

Postby beardmcdoug » Thu Nov 09, 2017 10:56 am

bucfanclw wrote:
beardmcdoug wrote:
lmao I'm well aware that we already pay for insurance; read the words: "too much" and "premium"

If insurance rates are cut for automated vehicles while yours stays the same, are they getting a discount or are you paying a premium?


a premium, relative

if you're a new driver and you're coming into this paradigm, and you opt to be a "manual driver", you will pay a premium

:P f your semantics
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Re: The Robots Are Coming

Postby beardmcdoug » Thu Nov 09, 2017 11:01 am

uscbucsfan wrote:
beardmcdoug wrote:
lol only a matter of time before the humans are dubbed (and with good reason, tbh) too much of a liability to be steering their own car on the road. Insurance risk will dictate this - you will pay a premium for being a "manual" operator for a short transition period probably - then a few years later, we're kicked out of the drive seat for good!

Enjoy driving while you can fellers. hopefully it doesn't happen too soon. I love driving. But I'm thinking this will most likely occur within our life time


Like with most automation predictions, "our lifetime" seems a bit rushed for people to not be allowed to drive themselves.


I highly doubt this one though. The technology is already ready (it's at about 99% of the way to "being there", its just in the fine-tune stage), the people want it (you've got to remember what phone-obsessed morons the majority of society is), and the lowered costs will create a windfall in that direction once the first domino falls

I am 29. By the year 2067, not a soul will manually operate a vehicle. feel free to bump this around then if I'm wrong :P
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Re: The Robots Are Coming

Postby bucfanclw » Thu Nov 09, 2017 11:11 am

beardmcdoug wrote:
bucfanclw wrote:If insurance rates are cut for automated vehicles while yours stays the same, are they getting a discount or are you paying a premium?


a premium, relative

if you're a new driver and you're coming into this paradigm, and you opt to be a "manual driver", you will pay a premium

:P f your semantics

So of all the discounts that an insurance company can offer for things ranging from lower horsepower car to setting up automatic payments, this one discount is suddenly some sort of paradigm shift for you?
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Re: The Robots Are Coming

Postby Zarniwoop » Thu Nov 09, 2017 11:27 am

Yeah, I'm not following this line of thinking.

Quite rightly insurance rates should be set up by actuarial tables. If driver less cars cause less accidents in the future, they should get a lower rate. If people cause more accidents, they should get a higher rate.


It's one of the things I absolutely hate about our current form of health insurance, particularly group insurance -- we don't use actuarial tables for life choices that impact health costs. For example, I choose to ride dirtbikes...a sport that leads to massive health care bills (I have broken about 10 bones in my life doing it)....yet I don't have to pay a surcharge for this. The guy who would rather sit at home and watch golf on TV has to subsidize me.
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Re: The Robots Are Coming

Postby beardmcdoug » Thu Nov 09, 2017 11:50 am

... you don't think the idea that you literally will not be influencing the vehicle's movement, besides setting a destination when you get in, is some sort of paradigm shift (especially in regards to liability)?

this isn't even on the spectrum. this isn't "oh people with fast cars have a tendency to drive faster and increase their risk by some marginal 5-10%, so we're going to charge them a marginal 5-10% premium for driving that fast car"

this is "the people who elect to 'drive' driverless cars are not even remotely involved with any sort of driving behavior and any accident that occurs with them inside the vehicle had was of absolutely zero consequence of their actions while in the car"

how is that not a complete paradigm shift?
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Re: The Robots Are Coming

Postby Zarniwoop » Thu Nov 09, 2017 12:07 pm

beardmcdoug wrote:... you don't think the idea that you literally will not be influencing the vehicle's movement, besides setting a destination when you get in, is some sort of paradigm shift (especially in regards to liability)?

this isn't even on the spectrum. this isn't "oh people with fast cars have a tendency to drive faster and increase their risk by some marginal 5-10%, so we're going to charge them a marginal 5-10% premium for driving that fast car"

this is "the people who elect to 'drive' driverless cars are not even remotely involved with any sort of driving behavior and any accident that occurs with them inside the vehicle had was of absolutely zero consequence of their actions while in the car"

how is that not a complete paradigm shift?




This is an interesting thought....maybe the insurance should actually be carried by the auto manufacturer?
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Re: The Robots Are Coming

Postby beardmcdoug » Thu Nov 09, 2017 12:20 pm

Zarniwoop wrote:
beardmcdoug wrote:... you don't think the idea that you literally will not be influencing the vehicle's movement, besides setting a destination when you get in, is some sort of paradigm shift (especially in regards to liability)?

this isn't even on the spectrum. this isn't "oh people with fast cars have a tendency to drive faster and increase their risk by some marginal 5-10%, so we're going to charge them a marginal 5-10% premium for driving that fast car"

this is "the people who elect to 'drive' driverless cars are not even remotely involved with any sort of driving behavior and any accident that occurs with them inside the vehicle had was of absolutely zero consequence of their actions while in the car"

how is that not a complete paradigm shift?




This is an interesting thought....maybe the insurance should actually be carried by the auto manufacturer?


that was my thought as I was typing out the original post about this - apparently its a major question in the minds of the people working on this - between the vehicle manufacturer, navigation systems, insurance agencies, and gov, it's still a major question how this is all going to work. it is the question - not whether this will work or not, it is - no matter what; its just a matter of ironing out the bureaucratic details to make the jump relatively seamless. make no mistake though, clw, this is absolutely a paradigm shift, and this liability detail is really the only speed bump. and it will get solved

edit: it's also why I believe google is going to be the lead in this, not a car company. its the navigation system that is the most critical aspect of eliminating danger/liability - the car is just the relative blunt tool; and its easier to be a incredibly endowed information company taking on a piece of machinery than it is a machine manufacturing company, trying to learn to be a high tech, high fidelity information/systems company. google will push their single-point liability approach, handling all things under their umbrella and government will give them the green light due to the simplicity. IMO of course
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Re: The Robots Are Coming

Postby Nano » Thu Nov 09, 2017 4:26 pm

So when do we get self driving flying cars?
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Re: The Robots Are Coming

Postby beardmcdoug » Thu Nov 09, 2017 4:31 pm

Nano wrote:So when do we get self driving flying cars?


soon?

https://www.space.com/38722-uber-flying-cars-nasa-air-traffic-control.html

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Re: The Robots Are Coming

Postby Rocker » Thu Nov 09, 2017 10:03 pm

beardmcdoug wrote:
Nano wrote:So when do we get self driving flying cars?


soon?

https://www.space.com/38722-uber-flying-cars-nasa-air-traffic-control.html



As an extremely, albeit niche, well trained avionics tech... **** THAT. Ain’t no way in hell I’d let anybody I care about in one of those.

That said, there’s a few people I’d buy tickets for.
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Re: The Robots Are Coming

Postby Zarniwoop » Thu Nov 09, 2017 10:12 pm

Uh Oh BMD....Ford is even turning their humans into robots!!


https://www.yahoo.com/tech/ford-tests-e ... 00780.html






Seems pretty cool.
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Re: The Robots Are Coming

Postby Buc2 » Wed Nov 29, 2017 8:42 am

Automation: Not so dire as one might think. Of course, those of us in high-risk jobs would do very well to preemptively seek training in lower risk jobs now rather than wait until they find themselves out of a job due to automation.

Automation could kill 73 million U.S. jobs by 2030
Paul Davidson, USA TODAY , WZZM 7:15 AM. EST November 29, 2017

Automation could destroy as many as 73 million U.S. jobs by 2030, but economic growth, rising productivity and other forces could more than offset the losses, according to a new report by McKinsey Global Institute.

“The dire predictions that robots are going to take our jobs are overstated,” says Susan Lund, the group’s director of research and co-author of the study. “There will be enough jobs for everyone in most sectors.”

Yet maintaining full employment will require a huge overhaul of the economy and labor market that rivals or exceeds the nation’s massive shifts from agriculture- and manufacturing-dominated societies over the past 165 years, the report says.

“I think it’s going to be a difficult transition,” Lund says.

Machines and artificial intelligence are already spreading rapidly with the advent of with self-driving cars, software that can respond to customer service inquiries and robots that can man assembly lines, flip hamburgers and check store inventory.

In a study early this year, McKinsey found that about half of all work activities globally have the technological potential to be automated, but the new report provides a more realistic assessment based on economic, social and technical factors. It concludes that from zero to a third of work activities could be displaced by 2030.

In the U.S., 39 million to 73 million jobs could be destroyed, but about 20 million of those displaced workers can be shifted fairly easily into similar occupations, though they may take on slightly different tasks, the report says. That means 16 million to 54 million workers — or as much as a third of the U.S. workforce — will need to be retrained for entirely new occupations.

Globally, up to 800 million workers could be displaced and as many as 375 million may need to learn new skills for new occupational categories. Advanced economies such as the U.S. that have higher wages are more vulnerable to the adoption of labor-saving technology.

The employment growth needed to replace the jobs eradicated will come in part from automation itself — the new workers needed to operate the machines, as well as the increased productivity and economic growth that automation will generate through bigger company profits and higher wages. Also, however, jobs will be created from rising incomes and consumption, an aging population that will demand more health care professionals and investment in infrastructure and renewable energy, the study says.

Jobs most susceptible to automation are physical ones in predictable environments. Those include workers who operate machinery, prepare fast food, collect and process data, originate mortgages and do paralegal and accounting work.

Jobs safest from the effects of automation involve managing people, high-level expertise and unpredictable environments. They include engineers, scientists, health care providers, educators and IT professionals, as well as gardeners, plumbers and elder care providers.

As a result, high-wage workers are expected to be less affected by the sweeping changes because they have skills that machines can’t replace. Low-wage jobs also could grow rapidly, partly because they cost employers less and so are often not worth supplanting with technology, while many are in health care, such as home health aides. That means middle-wage jobs will continue to decline, widening the divide between wealthy and low-income households, the report says.

The biggest challenge, Lund says, will be retraining millions of workers midcareer. Governments and businesses already have fallen short in the retraining of workers who lost jobs in the recession of 2007 to 2009.

“The big question isn’t, 'Will there be jobs?' ” Lund says. “The big question is, 'Will people who lost jobs be able to get new ones?' ”

According to the report, “there are few precedents in which societies have successfully retrained such large numbers of people.”

Governments will also need to provide income support and other assistance to help workers transition to new occupations and increase investments in infrastructure and energy to boost economic growth, the study says.

The authors acknowledge that the adoption of automation could be far slower than they anticipate, perhaps forcing fewer than 10 million workers globally to switch occupations.

Even under the more rapid spread of the technologies, the authors conclude that the six major countries they studied in detail, including the U.S., should be at or near full employment by 2030. But if many displaced workers don’t have new jobs within a year, unemployment could rise and dampen wage growth” in the short and medium term.

© 2017 USATODAY.COM
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Re: The Robots Are Coming

Postby Zarniwoop » Wed Nov 29, 2017 8:59 am

A guy from McKinsey was on NPR last week discussing this issue. He basically said the same things -- with very few exceptions, automation and technology has ended up creating jobs...not destroying them.

Good article BUC2...thanks for posting
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Re: The Robots Are Coming

Postby Buc2 » Wed Nov 29, 2017 9:17 am

Zarniwoop wrote:A guy from McKinsey was on NPR last week discussing this issue. He basically said the same things -- with very few exceptions, automation and technology has ended up creating jobs...not destroying them.

Good article BUC2...thanks for posting

For me, this shouldn't be much of an issue since I'm eyeing retirement at some point over the next 10 years. For my two daughters, however, it certainly will be an issue. One is currently a manager of a cellular retail store and is eyeing a transition to real estate sales. The other just recently transitioned into the IT field. The former probably needs to rethink her choice and consider retraining in a lower risk job now rather than later. The latter needs to stick with and continue to progress in the IT field.
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Re: The Robots Are Coming

Postby Zarniwoop » Wed Nov 29, 2017 9:21 am

yep, undoubtedly people will have to pay more attention to career and industry choice as the next tech/automation wave comes through

But the same things holds true today that has always held true - gather as many valuable skills and as much diverse knowledge as you can....someone does that, and even if their particular job is automated away, they will do just fine.
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Re: The Robots Are Coming

Postby deltbucs » Wed Nov 29, 2017 10:45 am

Buc2 wrote:
Zarniwoop wrote:A guy from McKinsey was on NPR last week discussing this issue. He basically said the same things -- with very few exceptions, automation and technology has ended up creating jobs...not destroying them.

Good article BUC2...thanks for posting

For me, this shouldn't be much of an issue since I'm eyeing retirement at some point over the next 10 years. For my two daughters, however, it certainly will be an issue. One is currently a manager of a cellular retail store and is eyeing a transition to real estate sales. The other just recently transitioned into the IT field. The former probably needs to rethink her choice and consider retraining in a lower risk job now rather than later. The latter needs to stick with and continue to progress in the IT field.

I'm in my mid-30's and doing well for myself. I've worked in the IT field basically since I graduated high school. I started going back to school and learning coding last spring. Currently taking 3 courses all in different programming languages. Probably going to even take a full load next semester and wrap up a little AS in programming within the next year. I'm actually really enjoying learning the stuff.
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Re: The Robots Are Coming

Postby DreadNaught » Wed Nov 29, 2017 10:54 am



This is some I-Robot type stuff...

I love Elon Musk's tweet about this video.

Elon Musk‏Verified account
@elonmusk
Nov 26
This is nothing. In a few years, that bot will move so fast you’ll need a strobe light to see it. Sweet dreams…
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Re: The Robots Are Coming

Postby beardmcdoug » Wed Nov 29, 2017 1:22 pm

Buc2 wrote:Automation: Not so dire as one might think. Of course, those of us in high-risk jobs would do very well to preemptively seek training in lower risk jobs now rather than wait until they find themselves out of a job due to automation.

Automation could kill 73 million U.S. jobs by 2030
Paul Davidson, USA TODAY , WZZM 7:15 AM. EST November 29, 2017

Automation could destroy as many as 73 million U.S. jobs by 2030, but economic growth, rising productivity and other forces could more than offset the losses, according to a new report by McKinsey Global Institute.

“The dire predictions that robots are going to take our jobs are overstated,” says Susan Lund, the group’s director of research and co-author of the study. “There will be enough jobs for everyone in most sectors.”

Yet maintaining full employment will require a huge overhaul of the economy and labor market that rivals or exceeds the nation’s massive shifts from agriculture- and manufacturing-dominated societies over the past 165 years, the report says.

“I think it’s going to be a difficult transition,” Lund says.

Machines and artificial intelligence are already spreading rapidly with the advent of with self-driving cars, software that can respond to customer service inquiries and robots that can man assembly lines, flip hamburgers and check store inventory.

In a study early this year, McKinsey found that about half of all work activities globally have the technological potential to be automated, but the new report provides a more realistic assessment based on economic, social and technical factors. It concludes that from zero to a third of work activities could be displaced by 2030.

In the U.S., 39 million to 73 million jobs could be destroyed, but about 20 million of those displaced workers can be shifted fairly easily into similar occupations, though they may take on slightly different tasks, the report says. That means 16 million to 54 million workers — or as much as a third of the U.S. workforce — will need to be retrained for entirely new occupations.

Globally, up to 800 million workers could be displaced and as many as 375 million may need to learn new skills for new occupational categories. Advanced economies such as the U.S. that have higher wages are more vulnerable to the adoption of labor-saving technology.

The employment growth needed to replace the jobs eradicated will come in part from automation itself — the new workers needed to operate the machines, as well as the increased productivity and economic growth that automation will generate through bigger company profits and higher wages. Also, however, jobs will be created from rising incomes and consumption, an aging population that will demand more health care professionals and investment in infrastructure and renewable energy, the study says.

Jobs most susceptible to automation are physical ones in predictable environments. Those include workers who operate machinery, prepare fast food, collect and process data, originate mortgages and do paralegal and accounting work.

Jobs safest from the effects of automation involve managing people, high-level expertise and unpredictable environments. They include engineers, scientists, health care providers, educators and IT professionals, as well as gardeners, plumbers and elder care providers.

As a result, high-wage workers are expected to be less affected by the sweeping changes because they have skills that machines can’t replace. Low-wage jobs also could grow rapidly, partly because they cost employers less and so are often not worth supplanting with technology, while many are in health care, such as home health aides. That means middle-wage jobs will continue to decline, widening the divide between wealthy and low-income households, the report says.

The biggest challenge, Lund says, will be retraining millions of workers midcareer. Governments and businesses already have fallen short in the retraining of workers who lost jobs in the recession of 2007 to 2009.

“The big question isn’t, 'Will there be jobs?' ” Lund says. “The big question is, 'Will people who lost jobs be able to get new ones?' ”

According to the report, “there are few precedents in which societies have successfully retrained such large numbers of people.”

Governments will also need to provide income support and other assistance to help workers transition to new occupations and increase investments in infrastructure and energy to boost economic growth, the study says.

The authors acknowledge that the adoption of automation could be far slower than they anticipate, perhaps forcing fewer than 10 million workers globally to switch occupations.

Even under the more rapid spread of the technologies, the authors conclude that the six major countries they studied in detail, including the U.S., should be at or near full employment by 2030. But if many displaced workers don’t have new jobs within a year, unemployment could rise and dampen wage growth” in the short and medium term.

© 2017 USATODAY.COM


Forgive me (as usual) if I sound dumb as hell here, but:

"Automation: not as dire as we thought"
also,
"Automation could kill (39 to) 73 million US jobs by 2030"


Uhhhh... really? Automation not that dire?

According to http://www.deptofnumbers.com/employment/us/, there are roughly 150 million jobs in the US right now, filled by people.

150 million. And we're talking about losing 73 million jobs, or HALF, to automation in 13 years. And that's not a big deal?

Oh, but we can retrain about 20 million of those people into similar jobs, so its only 54 million, or 1/3rd of the working population that will need to find a new job all together.

"Yeah, but Beardmcdoug, you DO know that new jobs are created every day, and we've got plenty of time to create new jobs on the way to 2030, right?"

Oh yeah, good point, let's do the math. Let's say we continue on with our solid average of +200,000 jobs created per month:

200,000 jobs created x 12 months = 2.4 million jobs per year

2.4 million jobs created per year x 13 years = 31.2 million


So now we're looking at only 20 million people that don't "fit" into the economy in 2030 thanks to automation, taking into account the expect job growth during that time

Before we celebrate the fact that there will only be 20 million people completely out of a job and needing complete retraining, let's remember:

the 1,000,000 per year LEGAL immigrants that come to this country every year (so +13 million people over 13 years, and say about half of that, conservatively, will be of working age and be looking for a job - so another 6.5 million)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Immigration_to_the_United_States

And let's not forget that, obviously, the population will grow over the next 13 years, adding more people into the job seeking pool, which will put us up to 360 million from our current 330 million. And since the birth rate in the US is right at replacement, we can assume that there will be roughly equal that amount becoming of working age over that time, and with roughly half of them looking for work, that gives us another +15 million
https://www.statista.com/statistics/183481/united-states-population-projection/


So all said and done, we're looking at roughly 40 million people in this country that flat out won't fit into the job sector by 2030 thanks to automation, taking into account both job sector growth and population growth over that time

And that's only up until 2030. We're not just going to hit pause on the automation trend at 2030. It only gets more sophisticated and "worse" for the worker from there. You don't just take the bottom half of the economic food pyramid and CRAM those workers into the top half without some SERIOUS market fuckery. You just don't. It's impossible.


Here's a few of my favorite lines in the article:
The employment growth needed to replace the jobs eradicated will come in part from automation itself — the new workers needed to operate the machines, as well as the increased productivity and economic growth that automation will generate through bigger company profits and higher wages.

LOL WHAT? Economic growth coming from taking 10 guys, replacing them with 2 robots, and then hiring 1 guy to watch the robots? Does this person understand what the term "net" means? The second line is pure fantasy within this paradigm of surplus workers and company structure based on turning the bottom of the pyramid into robots.

Jobs safest from the effects of automation involve managing people, high-level expertise and unpredictable environments. They include engineers, scientists, health care providers, educators and IT professionals, as well as gardeners, plumbers and elder care providers.

Beardmcdoug, you stupid ****, everybody should just become managers, doctors and scientists instead of working at mcdonalds!

Low-wage jobs also could grow rapidly, partly because they cost employers less and so are often not worth supplanting with technology,

LMAO


Not to mention, I'm willing to err on the side that we're vastly underestimating the impact and capabilities of AI/automation in terms of mobility, navigation and dexterity (exactly what DN is alluding to)

At least the article gets this:
“there are few precedents in which societies have successfully retrained such large numbers of people.”

and this:
Governments will also need to provide income support and other assistance to help workers transition to new occupations and increase investments in infrastructure and energy to boost economic growth, the study says.

right

I get that none of us truly know what this is all actually going to look like. But for an extensive study to release figures estimating that somewhere close to 1/3 of the US working population will flat out not fit in the economy in the next 13 years, and to insinuate that this isn't really a big deal just flat out doesn't add up to me. Figuring out this transformation is absolutely the most paramount issue to solve over the next 10-20-30-50 years and no politician has even remotely started the conversation lmao. Why? because every solution is so incredibly radical to anything we'd even consider, especially in this bi-partisan atmosphere. Radical problems necessitate radical solutions though...
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Re: The Robots Are Coming

Postby Mountaineer Buc » Wed Nov 29, 2017 1:37 pm

I get that none of us truly know what this is all actually going to look like.



Pretty much like this.

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Re: The Robots Are Coming

Postby RedLeader » Fri Dec 01, 2017 12:23 pm

Share of current work hours w/ potential for automation by 2030

Japan 26%
Germany 24%
US 23%
China 16%
India 9%

Global 15%

McKinsey Global Institute
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Re: The Robots Are Coming

Postby Zarniwoop » Fri Dec 01, 2017 12:24 pm

RedLeader wrote:Share of current work hours w/ potential for automation by 2030

Japan 26%
Germany 24%
US 23%
China 16%
India 9%

Global 15%

McKinsey Global Institute


Interesting...that would not have been my guess
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Re: The Robots Are Coming

Postby Buc2 » Fri Dec 01, 2017 1:02 pm

If interested, here's a link to the entire report...

Report - McKinsey Global Institute - November 2017
What the future of work will mean for jobs, skills, and wages
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Re: The Robots Are Coming

Postby RedLeader » Fri Dec 01, 2017 3:26 pm

Zarniwoop wrote:
RedLeader wrote:Share of current work hours w/ potential for automation by 2030

Japan 26%
Germany 24%
US 23%
China 16%
India 9%

Global 15%

McKinsey Global Institute


Interesting...that would not have been my guess


Ya, not as bad as I've seen suggested..

Although, will be interesting to see how the US can affect that by pushing a 50% increase on the minimum wage.
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Re: The Robots Are Coming

Postby Zarniwoop » Fri Dec 01, 2017 3:40 pm

I'd like to see the follow-up on projections of new jobs and industries that will be created by these technologies
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Re: The Robots Are Coming

Postby bucfanclw » Fri Dec 01, 2017 4:13 pm

Zarniwoop wrote:I'd like to see the follow-up on projections of new jobs and industries that will be created by these technologies

"If history is any guide, we could also expect that 8 to 9 percent of 2030 labor demand will be in new types of occupations that have not existed before."

My vote is Wizards. Time to enroll at Hogwarts to get re-trained!
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Re: The Robots Are Coming

Postby beardmcdoug » Fri Dec 01, 2017 4:14 pm

Zarniwoop wrote:I'd like to see the follow-up on projections of new jobs and industries that will be created by these technologies


me too :mrgreen:
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Re: The Robots Are Coming

Postby RedLeader » Fri Dec 01, 2017 4:36 pm

I’d also posit that a large, aging, baby boomer population is going to be vacating a lot of jobs that younger generations are not necessarily very eager to fill that are prime for automation.

Not to mention all those jobs we currently have immigrants doing for us... Cause, you know, lazy Americans sure as hell dont want to do them - amirite!



So it could be a wash at the end of the day!
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Re: The Robots Are Coming

Postby Mountaineer Buc » Sat Dec 02, 2017 8:45 am

A big reason Americans don't do those types of jobs, Red is because they don't pay for ****.

Not saying there's a line of millenials standing by the road staring longingly at an orange grove, but given equal pay and opportunity to even get the job, I'd venture that plenty of folks would rather pick oranges than work at a gas station.
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Re: The Robots Are Coming

Postby Zarniwoop » Wed Dec 13, 2017 9:15 pm

The robots are coming to kick out the homeless

https://www.yahoo.com/news/robot-wages- ... 53050.html
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Re: The Robots Are Coming

Postby Buc2 » Thu Dec 14, 2017 10:27 am

Zarniwoop wrote:The robots are coming to kick out the homeless

https://www.yahoo.com/news/robot-wages- ... 53050.html


Uh oh!

A similar security robot equipped with weapons has been demonstrated in China, potentially pointing to the direction such autonomous machines are taking.

The AnBot, developed at China’s National Defense University, was described by local media last year as the country’s first “intelligent security robot” and came equipped with “sensors that mimic the human brain, eyes and ears.”

In the future, AnBot’s developers hope, it will be deployed in areas prone to civil unrest or violence.

“AnBot has a high degree of autonomy,” said Xiao Xiangjiang from the National Defense University. “It can patrol, avoid obstacles, identify and recharge on its own. It is equipped with weapons to prevent and control violence by remote control. Moreover, it could be a service provider, which makes it more practical.”
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