Random Education News

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Re: Random Education News

Postby Mountaineer Buc » Wed Feb 14, 2018 3:56 pm

I keep thinking elementary and middle school education should focus on exposure to a variety of topics to discern aptitude areas rather than insist on an ability to test well on all topics.

Let those aptitude areas guide the student into diving deeper into them in HS. People balk at the idea of specialization, but why? How deep does a well rounded education have to be when it's purpose is to teach the student what is happening in the world around them? They don't have to be subject matter experts on everything.
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Re: Random Education News

Postby bucfanclw » Wed Feb 14, 2018 4:04 pm

Mountaineer Buc wrote:I keep thinking elementary and middle school education should focus on exposure to a variety of topics to discern aptitude areas rather than insist on an ability to test well on all topics.

Let those aptitude areas guide the student into diving deeper into them in HS. People balk at the idea of specialization, but why? How deep does a well rounded education have to be when it's purpose is to teach the student what is happening in the world around them? They don't have to be subject matter experts on everything.

That's actually one of the things Eva Moskowitz pushes. The focus needs to be earlier (into Pre K) to recognize strengths and correctly foster students early.
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Re: Random Education News

Postby Zarniwoop » Wed Feb 14, 2018 4:16 pm

Mountaineer Buc wrote:I keep thinking elementary and middle school education should focus on exposure to a variety of topics to discern aptitude areas rather than insist on an ability to test well on all topics.

Let those aptitude areas guide the student into diving deeper into them in HS. People balk at the idea of specialization, but why? How deep does a well rounded education have to be when it's purpose is to teach the student what is happening in the world around them? They don't have to be subject matter experts on everything.



I don’t agree on specialization at an early age at all. I’m actually ok with the amount of choice students have now as it pertains to coursework. IMO even college is often too specialized. I’m a big proponent of the Medieval liberal arts approach to education. People will have 40+ years of work life to specialize.,..college is their only chance to explore breadth and modalities of thought


I can tell you that as an educator my focus on actual content knowledge is probably 1/4 at most. My main focus is on teaching how to think and learn. And within business, math and stats courses...they all allow themselves to certain types of thinking and reasoning. I cannot teach the same type of learning and thinking that is taught in physics, philosophy, English or history.

When I’m having the college discussion with my daughter in 10 years, while the choice will ultimately be hers, I am absolutely going to try to steer her towards a great books, liberal arts school (regardless of what topic she wants to study...with just a few notable exceptions)
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Re: Random Education News

Postby Mountaineer Buc » Wed Feb 14, 2018 4:23 pm

Zarniwoop wrote:
Mountaineer Buc wrote:I keep thinking elementary and middle school education should focus on exposure to a variety of topics to discern aptitude areas rather than insist on an ability to test well on all topics.

Let those aptitude areas guide the student into diving deeper into them in HS. People balk at the idea of specialization, but why? How deep does a well rounded education have to be when it's purpose is to teach the student what is happening in the world around them? They don't have to be subject matter experts on everything.



I don’t agree on specialization at an early age at all. I’m actually ok with the amount of choice students have now as it pertains to coursework. IMO even college is often too specialized. I’m a big proponent of the Medieval liberal arts approach to education. People will have 40+ years of work life to specialize.,..college is their only chance to explore breadth and modalities of thought


I can tell you that as an educator my focus on actual content knowledge is probably 1/4 at most. My main focus is on teaching how to think and learn. And within business, math and stats courses...they all allow themselves to certain types of thinking and reasoning. I cannot teach the same type of learning and thinking that is taught in physics, philosophy, English or history.

When I’m having the college discussion with my daughter in 10 years, while the choice will ultimately be hers, I am absolutely going to try to steer her towards a great books, liberal arts school (regardless of what topic she wants to study...with just a few notable exceptions)


Think of practical application though. I have a 16 year old that knows all kinds of **** about all kinds of **** but has absolutely no clue what she wants to study. I can tall her that she doesn't have to have it all figured out right now and that I din't find my career path until the tail end of my sophomore year of college.

At the same time, there's a money issue. She better sort out what it is she wants to learn about prior to graduating HS because choice of college weighs heavily on that direction. I would never encourage her to spend four years racking up a bunch of student loan debt to get a Regents degree.
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Re: Random Education News

Postby Zarniwoop » Wed Feb 14, 2018 4:30 pm

Selmon Rules wrote:
Zarniwoop wrote:Random lottery. Everyone who applies has equal chance.

In the book she goes out of her way to address this as it is a common question, she had the stats that showed the % of her charter schools kids that were economically disadvantaged was the same as the traditional N.Y. state public school



Bviously there is some self selection bias. Only parents who give a damn about their kids education and are involved in it would sign up for the lottery. So I’m sure they get the most motivated of the poor kids...or at east those held to higher standards when they get home after school

Thanks, was curious. We have too many kids in school taking classes that are supposed to get them ready for college when many have no desire or motivation to do so and I am assuming, first mistake, that these kids you are talking about do have higher expectations placed on them by parents so it would stand to reason they would do better.

I teach Special Ed students with behavioral disorders that have no intrinsic or extrinsic reasons to excel in school so it is difficult to get them to attempt to do anything. Many of the parents of my students don't bother to show up for IEP meetings and some of the ones that do, you can see that they are simply beat down trying to manage their child at home. I have former students that will spend the majority of their lives in prison due to their choices and some that have gone on to be productive citizens.... They keep me coming back for more every year


I very much agree with the sentiment that the one size fits all let’s train everyone for college mentality isn’t a good one.

I know it’s an uncommon idea but I think we need to have separate schools or curriculums not just for ability of students (we kind of do that already with AP classes) but also for different life paths.
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Re: Random Education News

Postby Zarniwoop » Wed Feb 14, 2018 4:35 pm

Mountaineer Buc wrote:
Zarniwoop wrote:

I don’t agree on specialization at an early age at all. I’m actually ok with the amount of choice students have now as it pertains to coursework. IMO even college is often too specialized. I’m a big proponent of the Medieval liberal arts approach to education. People will have 40+ years of work life to specialize.,..college is their only chance to explore breadth and modalities of thought


I can tell you that as an educator my focus on actual content knowledge is probably 1/4 at most. My main focus is on teaching how to think and learn. And within business, math and stats courses...they all allow themselves to certain types of thinking and reasoning. I cannot teach the same type of learning and thinking that is taught in physics, philosophy, English or history.

When I’m having the college discussion with my daughter in 10 years, while the choice will ultimately be hers, I am absolutely going to try to steer her towards a great books, liberal arts school (regardless of what topic she wants to study...with just a few notable exceptions)


Think of practical application though. I have a 16 year old that knows all kinds of **** about all kinds of **** but has absolutely no clue what she wants to study. I can tall her that she doesn't have to have it all figured out right now and that I din't find my career path until the tail end of my sophomore year of college.

At the same time, there's a money issue. She better sort out what it is she wants to learn about prior to graduating HS because choice of college weighs heavily on that direction. I would never encourage her to spend four years racking up a bunch of student loan debt to get a Regents degree.




I would argue that if a 16 year old knows they want to go to college they shouldn’t have to choose what they want to be so early. Their brains and abilities and skills are going to change over the next 5+ years. They should be worried about learning higher level learning skills, not functional or discipline based content. Students far too often choose a major and stick with it long before they even know what the discipline truly entails. And in the end they are horribly mismatched and society is far worse off for it


Again, I know I’m way out in left field compared to most people (certainly compared to nearly all business oriented conservatives), but I just don’t see value in learning too much discipline related content. I’d much rather see students hone their critical thinking, rheotoric, analytical, communication skills, etc
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Re: Random Education News

Postby Buc2 » Wed Feb 14, 2018 4:40 pm

Mountaineer Buc wrote:I keep thinking elementary and middle school education should focus on exposure to a variety of topics to discern aptitude areas rather than insist on an ability to test well on all topics.

Let those aptitude areas guide the student into diving deeper into them in HS. People balk at the idea of specialization, but why? How deep does a well rounded education have to be when it's purpose is to teach the student what is happening in the world around them? They don't have to be subject matter experts on everything.


Some Virginia public school districts have an interesting way of doing things. At least at the high school level. In the Richmond metro area, where my granddaughter now lives, 8th graders can (they don't have to but are highly encouraged to) apply to different high schools based on the specialization they want to concentrate on after high school, especially if they plan to go on to college. They also encourage students to apply at more than one school, though, just in case they don't get into their preferred choice. She did 3 interviews at 3 different high schools. One for a medical concentration. I would assume they have a higher concentration in the bio fields (biology, anatomy, etc.). She did another for drama. She loves the stage and the behind the scenes stuff that goes with play productions. I can't remember what her 3rd choice was. Anyway, I'm not certain when she will know which, if any, of the schools she interviewed with selected her. I'm sure there are a lot more details to this, but that's the gist of it I think. Oh, and it definitely takes a commitment from the parent as well because the student won't have access to public school transportation if they end up going to a school out of their district. Meaning someone has to be willing to drop them off and pick them up every day.

For this alone, I'm glad they moved out of Lynchburg this past summer. Lynchburg is too small to do a program like they do in the Richmond area.
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Re: Random Education News

Postby bucfanclw » Wed Feb 14, 2018 4:51 pm

Buc2 wrote:For this alone, I'm glad they moved out of Lynchburg this past summer. Lynchburg is too small to do a program like they do in the Richmond area.

That's the biggest challenge to all of this. Very bright students in smaller towns and rural areas will always end up left behind because it's just not feasible to open up more school choices in sparsely populated areas. It's the school district problem on a much larger scale as a family can't always get their child off to a school where the closest option to the local public school is 50 miles away.
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Re: Random Education News

Postby Buc2 » Wed Feb 14, 2018 5:02 pm

bucfanclw wrote:
Buc2 wrote:For this alone, I'm glad they moved out of Lynchburg this past summer. Lynchburg is too small to do a program like they do in the Richmond area.

That's the biggest challenge to all of this. Very bright students in smaller towns and rural areas will always end up left behind because it's just not feasible to open up more school choices in sparsely populated areas. It's the school district problem on a much larger scale as a family can't always get their child off to a school where the closest option to the local public school is 50 miles away.

It absolutely is a big disadvantage. The only way that can be remedied is with some sort of comprehensive online program where the student can "virtually" participate in the classroom. Not sure how that would work with lab classes though. And it definitely would be tough with a drama program. But it could work for a variety of disciplines I'd think.
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Re: Random Education News

Postby Selmon Rules » Wed Feb 14, 2018 7:41 pm

Zarniwoop wrote:
Selmon Rules wrote:Thanks, was curious. We have too many kids in school taking classes that are supposed to get them ready for college when many have no desire or motivation to do so and I am assuming, first mistake, that these kids you are talking about do have higher expectations placed on them by parents so it would stand to reason they would do better.

I teach Special Ed students with behavioral disorders that have no intrinsic or extrinsic reasons to excel in school so it is difficult to get them to attempt to do anything. Many of the parents of my students don't bother to show up for IEP meetings and some of the ones that do, you can see that they are simply beat down trying to manage their child at home. I have former students that will spend the majority of their lives in prison due to their choices and some that have gone on to be productive citizens.... They keep me coming back for more every year


I very much agree with the sentiment that the one size fits all let’s train everyone for college mentality isn’t a good one.

I know it’s an uncommon idea but I think we need to have separate schools or curriculums not just for ability of students (we kind of do that already with AP classes) but also for different life paths.

One of my students in particular wants to be an auto mechanic, nothing wrong with that at least he has a goal, but there are no more shop classes taught in schools these days and the local Vo-tech is by application only and with his EBD status, he will never be given the opportunity to go there. This used to be where those kids went.... He can't read or do math anywhere near grade level but he damn sure has to pass those same classes as everyone else to get his diploma.

I don't blame him for being frustrated with school and acting out the way he does sometimes
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Re: Random Education News

Postby Selmon Rules » Wed Feb 14, 2018 7:44 pm

Buc2 wrote:
bucfanclw wrote:That's the biggest challenge to all of this. Very bright students in smaller towns and rural areas will always end up left behind because it's just not feasible to open up more school choices in sparsely populated areas. It's the school district problem on a much larger scale as a family can't always get their child off to a school where the closest option to the local public school is 50 miles away.

It absolutely is a big disadvantage. The only way that can be remedied is with some sort of comprehensive online program where the student can "virtually" participate in the classroom. Not sure how that would work with lab classes though. And it definitely would be tough with a drama program. But it could work for a variety of disciplines I'd think.

Just as the large, relatively anyway, school district I work in has phased out Vo-tech programs that give choices to some students some smaller districts like one I taught at in KY still have a Vo-tech programs at the local county high school.... Odd that the small districts seem to be able to do that while my 7 high school district cannot....
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Re: Random Education News

Postby Zarniwoop » Wed Feb 14, 2018 9:10 pm

Selmon Rules wrote:
Zarniwoop wrote:
I very much agree with the sentiment that the one size fits all let’s train everyone for college mentality isn’t a good one.

I know it’s an uncommon idea but I think we need to have separate schools or curriculums not just for ability of students (we kind of do that already with AP classes) but also for different life paths.

One of my students in particular wants to be an auto mechanic, nothing wrong with that at least he has a goal, but there are no more shop classes taught in schools these days and the local Vo-tech is by application only and with his EBD status, he will never be given the opportunity to go there. This used to be where those kids went.... He can't read or do math anywhere near grade level but he damn sure has to pass those same classes as everyone else to get his diploma.

I don't blame him for being frustrated with school and acting out the way he does sometimes




As a proponent of choice I certainly support the creation of more vo-ed training if there is demand for it.
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Re: Random Education News

Postby NYBF » Thu Feb 15, 2018 9:59 am

Zarniwoop wrote:
I can tell you that as an educator my focus on actual content knowledge is probably 1/4 at most. My main focus is on teaching how to think and learn. And within business, math and stats courses...they all allow themselves to certain types of thinking and reasoning. I cannot teach the same type of learning and thinking that is taught in physics, philosophy, English or history.


This is a great approach that I wish was more prevalent earlier in education. For parent - teacher conferences this year I was so happy to talk with my son's Research teacher. One period every other day they're in class. The whole year is a series of small projects - some solo, some as teams. He throws out a theme, and the kids can pick anything they want that has to do with that theme, research it, and do a small project. He said he loves teaching the class because he "does not have to teach to a test."
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Re: Random Education News

Postby Buc2 » Thu Feb 15, 2018 10:06 am

NYBF wrote:
Zarniwoop wrote:
I can tell you that as an educator my focus on actual content knowledge is probably 1/4 at most. My main focus is on teaching how to think and learn. And within business, math and stats courses...they all allow themselves to certain types of thinking and reasoning. I cannot teach the same type of learning and thinking that is taught in physics, philosophy, English or history.


This is a great approach that I wish was more prevalent earlier in education. For parent - teacher conferences this year I was so happy to talk with my son's Research teacher. One period every other day they're in class. The whole year is a series of small projects - some solo, some as teams. He throws out a theme, and the kids can pick anything they want that has to do with that theme, research it, and do a small project. He said he loves teaching the class because he "does not have to teach to a test."

Teaching them to think. What a concept, eh?
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Re: Random Education News

Postby Zarniwoop » Thu Feb 15, 2018 11:23 am

Buc2 wrote:Teaching them to think. What a concept, eh?


You'd be amazed at just how few teachers (at all levels do this). My students continually complain to me that in over 1/2 their classes they feel they have to write answers on exams and essays the way the teachers want them to. Basically that rather than writing a good essay, they just have to parrot what the professor says...whether it be in English class, Philosophy or even Business. Critical thinking unfortunately has been removed from far too many courses because of egotistical professors and instructors.

And at the K-12 level students have another obstacle to critical thinking beyond egotistical, close minded instructors -- the bureaucracy of student testing. All the tests are focused on lower level thinking skills because they lend themselves to multiple choice questions. Even if there was a good teacher that wanted to help students develop, their hands are tied.


I'm not sure if any of you are familiar with this scheme but its widely regarded as the best framework for student learning -- Bloom's Taxonomy. It starts with the most elementary type of learning, remembering and moves through to the highest evaluating and creating.

The education model in the US (and its focus on standardized curriculum and testing) basically just emphasizes the bottom two levels...and its sad.

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Re: Random Education News

Postby Buc2 » Thu Feb 15, 2018 11:41 am

Zarniwoop wrote:
Buc2 wrote:Teaching them to think. What a concept, eh?


You'd be amazed at just how few teachers (at all levels do this). My students continually complain to me that in over 1/2 their classes they feel they have to write answers on exams and essays the way the teachers want them to. Basically that rather than writing a good essay, they just have to parrot what the professor says...whether it be in English class, Philosophy or even Business. Critical thinking unfortunately has been removed from far too many courses because of egotistical professors and instructors.

And at the K-12 level students have another obstacle to critical thinking beyond egotistical, close minded instructors -- the bureaucracy of student testing. All the tests are focused on lower level thinking skills because they lend themselves to multiple choice questions. Even if there was a good teacher that wanted to help students develop, their hands are tied.


I'm not sure if any of you are familiar with this scheme but its widely regarded as the best framework for student learning -- Bloom's Taxonomy. It starts with the most elementary type of learning, remembering and moves through to the highest evaluating and creating.

The education model in the US (and its focus on standardized curriculum and testing) basically just emphasizes the bottom two levels...and its sad.

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I feel like the Gen-Xers and, perhaps, the oldest of the Millennials (depending on when you think that generation began) were the last generation of American kids that grew up employing a goodly portion of that pyramid in public secondary schools. At least in the advanced classes that is. Perhaps the private secondary schools still do a good job creating thinkers but I honestly don't know. Perhaps you have a more knowledgeable opinion on that since you probably get to see kids that came from, both, public and private schools.
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Re: Random Education News

Postby Zarniwoop » Thu Feb 15, 2018 11:58 am

I can't speak to the generational thing very much, but I do suspect your premise can be correct -- I know when I was in public school (graduated HS in 1990), we didn't do nearly as much standardized testing and Ohio didn't force every high school to use the same books as many states do now. Our assignments covered the entire spectrum of Bloom: testing, writing papers, giving presentations, etc.


As for the public vs private debate....there is ZERO question that private school kids are more prepared for college in my experience of teaching the last 15 years and that private high schools have much more flexibility in their curriculum (I have checked out many of the local private schools for my daughter, most are K-12 so I get a glimpse into the entire program). They don't have the bureaucratic controls that public schools have. They also have much higher standards.

Now I'm sure someone can argue that those schools do better because middle class kids can go to them and they essentially self select (though those schools do give out incredible scholarships to lower income families)...and I'm certain that fact does indeed explain some variance in academic success of public vs private kids, but I think freedom, flexibility and curriculum explain more.



*to be clear this doesn't apply to every single private school and every single public school, but rather to the median. There are plenty of public schools in the Dallas area (regular and charter) that are very very good.
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Re: Random Education News

Postby Pirate Life » Thu Feb 15, 2018 3:43 pm

Zarniwoop wrote:
Buc2 wrote:Teaching them to think. What a concept, eh?


You'd be amazed at just how few teachers (at all levels do this). My students continually complain to me that in over 1/2 their classes they feel they have to write answers on exams and essays the way the teachers want them to. Basically that rather than writing a good essay, they just have to parrot what the professor says...whether it be in English class, Philosophy or even Business. Critical thinking unfortunately has been removed from far too many courses because of egotistical professors and instructors.

And at the K-12 level students have another obstacle to critical thinking beyond egotistical, close minded instructors -- the bureaucracy of student testing. All the tests are focused on lower level thinking skills because they lend themselves to multiple choice questions. Even if there was a good teacher that wanted to help students develop, their hands are tied.


I'm not sure if any of you are familiar with this scheme but its widely regarded as the best framework for student learning -- Bloom's Taxonomy. It starts with the most elementary type of learning, remembering and moves through to the highest evaluating and creating.

The education model in the US (and its focus on standardized curriculum and testing) basically just emphasizes the bottom two levels...and its sad.

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A lot of this shift came about from 'No Child Left Behind', once the gov't spending on education became tied to 'measurable goals', ie more standardized testing, schools (especially ones that were performing below the national achievement level) started teaching with the test in mind rather than with education in mind. Though as a GenXer myself, I can recall when I was in elementary school that teachers wanted us to memorize things like our multiplication tables rather than do the calculations so the seeds were certainly planted much earlier.
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Re: Random Education News

Postby Buc2 » Thu Feb 15, 2018 5:10 pm

Meh. We memorized multiplication tables back in the 60's. That's nothing new and there's nothing wrong with it. It helps one do simple calculations in their head quickly. It's a good exercise.
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Re: Random Education News

Postby NYBF » Thu Feb 15, 2018 5:16 pm

Buc2 wrote:Meh. We memorized multiplication tables back in the 60's. That's nothing new and there's nothing wrong with it. It helps one do simple calculations in their head quickly. It's a good exercise.


Funny thing - with all the teaching to the test and memorizing useless **** there is now, the one thing they're not allowed to memorize is the multiplication tables.
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Re: Random Education News

Postby Buc2 » Thu Feb 15, 2018 5:17 pm

NYBF wrote:
Buc2 wrote:Meh. We memorized multiplication tables back in the 60's. That's nothing new and there's nothing wrong with it. It helps one do simple calculations in their head quickly. It's a good exercise.


Funny thing - with all the teaching to the test and memorizing useless **** there is now, the one thing they're not allowed to memorize is the multiplication tables.

Figures.
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Re: Random Education News

Postby Zarniwoop » Thu Feb 15, 2018 5:21 pm

My daughter is in 3rd grade at a public school and she’s doing her 12 times table
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Re: Random Education News

Postby NYBF » Thu Feb 15, 2018 6:16 pm

Zarniwoop wrote:My daughter is in 3rd grade at a public school and she’s doing her 12 times table


Private school? Common core has scrubbed all mention of them. At least as of a few years ago when my son was learning multiplication.
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Re: Random Education News

Postby Zarniwoop » Thu Feb 15, 2018 6:25 pm

No she’s goes to public. I know as they get older and do longer multiplication they do that crazy new math way, but all the multiplication and division she is doing now is rote memorization. That being said, they are also doing the simple explanations too — 3x5 is adding up three groups of five.

Maybe it’s just her individual teacher that is adding the times table in ... I don’t know, I only have one child
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Re: Random Education News

Postby NYBF » Thu Feb 15, 2018 7:54 pm

Oh man, **** the new division. I'm a math guy, and the "new" way they do the multiplication makes sense. I don't agree with how they eliminated the tables up here, but at least that method makes sense.

The division? Nope. Completely stupid. Have fun once too to that point.
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Re: Random Education News

Postby Zarniwoop » Thu Feb 15, 2018 8:07 pm

NYBF wrote:Oh man, **** the new division. I'm a math guy, and the "new" way they do the multiplication makes sense. I don't agree with how they eliminated the tables up here, but at least that method makes sense.

The division? Nope. Completely stupid. Have fun once too to that point.




I remember the first time I saw someone do a division by hand on one of my exams — my first thought was “what the **** is this idiot doing?”. Lol.
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Re: Random Education News

Postby Buc2 » Fri Feb 16, 2018 8:17 am

NYBF wrote:
Zarniwoop wrote:My daughter is in 3rd grade at a public school and she’s doing her 12 times table


Private school? Common core has scrubbed all mention of them. At least as of a few years ago when my son was learning multiplication.

To echo Zarni, my granddaughter also attends public school and she had to learn the multiplication table as well. She was in elementary school from 2009-2015 (K-6). However, Virginia has not adopted Common Core as a standard either. Other states that have not adopted the Common Core standards are Texas, Nebraska, and Alaska. So that could partly explain why Zarni's daughter (Texas) and my granddaughter learned the tables.
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Re: Random Education News

Postby NYBF » Fri Feb 16, 2018 8:19 am

Woops. Completely read right over the public school part.
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Re: Random Education News

Postby Zarniwoop » Fri Feb 16, 2018 8:40 am

Buc2 wrote:
NYBF wrote:
Private school? Common core has scrubbed all mention of them. At least as of a few years ago when my son was learning multiplication.

To echo Zarni, my granddaughter also attends public school and she had to learn the multiplication table as well. She was in elementary school from 2009-2015 (K-6). However, Virginia has not adopted Common Core as a standard either. Other states that have not adopted the Common Core standards are Texas, Nebraska, and Alaska. So that could partly explain why Zarni's daughter (Texas) and my granddaughter learned the tables.


Thanks for that info about the states Buc2. Maybe that is the explanation
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Re: Random Education News

Postby Buc2 » Sun Feb 18, 2018 12:56 pm

Another opinion...

One, public education does not permit competition among schools. Journalist and columnist John Stossel has demonstrated over and over that public education is not only a monolithic monopoly, but it actively discourages innovative teachers or schools. Whenever shining examples (charter schools or successful teachers in low-income areas) wrest success from failure, the educational establishment knocks them down. It’s a classic “crabs in a bucket” metaphor, which Urban Dictionary defines as “a person (or subculture) that does everything in its power to destroy the ambitions of those among them who wish to improve themselves.” Wikipedia additionally describes the metaphor as “Individually, the crabs in the story could easily escape from the bucket, but instead they are described as grabbing at each other in a useless ‘king of the hill’ competition which prevents any from escaping and ensures their collective demise.”

“Why do they hate you?” Stossel asked New York City’s Success Academy charter school founder Eva Moskowitz.

“What we prove is that there’s nothing wrong with the children,” she replied. “There is something wrong with a system, a monopolistic system that is not allowing kids to succeed.”

See? Crabs in a bucket.

OK, that’s one of the problems with public education. Another is that schools have abandoned academics and have become nothing more than progressive factories designed to crank out social justice warriors. Social justice is all well and good, I guess, but it sure doesn’t do much to improve math scores, encourage literacy, or teach science. And silly me, I always thought math, reading, science and other academic subjects were the whole purpose of schools. I guess I’m wrong.

Consider the example of Edina, Minnesota, an upscale suburb of Minneapolis. A few years ago, the schools were the gold standard in the state, but “virtually overnight, its reputation has changed.”

Why? Social justice warriors took over. In a big way.

In 2013, “The Edina school district’s All for All plan mandated that henceforth ‘all teaching and learning experiences’ would be viewed through the ‘lens of racial equity,'” notes this article, “and that only ‘racially conscious’ teachers and administrators should be hired. District leaders assured parents this would reduce Edina’s racial achievement gap, which they attributed to ‘barriers rooted in racial constructs and cultural misunderstandings.'”

This indoctrination now begins in kindergarten, where recommended reading for children includes an ABC board book called – I kid you not – “A is for Activist” and filled with such nuggets as “F is for Feminist,” “C is for … Creative Counter to Corporate Vultures,” and “T is for Trans.”

The article continues:
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