The Science & Technology Thread

General Discussion on any Off Topic subject
post

Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby beardmcdoug » Thu Sep 22, 2016 8:48 am

paco74 wrote:"The 'impossible' EM Drive is about to be tested in space"

http://www.sciencealert.com/the-impossible-em-drive-is-about-to-be-tested-in-space


Holy **** they're already about to test it!? That's awesome! I read about this thing a little over a year ago and sort of forgot about it, wrote it off as a hoax. If it does indeed work, its a complete game changer
User avatar
beardmcdoug
 
Posts: 1093
Joined: Mon Sep 12, 2016 12:30 pm
Has thanked: 100 times
Been thanked: 79 times

Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby mdb1958 » Fri Sep 23, 2016 4:39 am

Harold (Sonny) White, the leader of the research group at Eaglework, predicts that a crewed mission to Mars inside a 2 MegaWatt nuclear electric propulsion spacecraft, powered by an EM Drive with a thrust/power input of 0.4 Newton/kW, could get to Mars in a mind-boggling 70 days.

Even more impressively, the NASA researchers predict that a trip to Alpha Centauri, the closest star system to our Solar System, would take just 92 years.
mdb1958
 
Posts: 6052
Joined: Wed Jan 14, 2015 4:11 pm
Has thanked: 128 times
Been thanked: 58 times

Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby beardmcdoug » Fri Sep 23, 2016 8:12 am

mdb1958 wrote:Harold (Sonny) White, the leader of the research group at Eaglework, predicts that a crewed mission to Mars inside a 2 MegaWatt nuclear electric propulsion spacecraft, powered by an EM Drive with a thrust/power input of 0.4 Newton/kW, could get to Mars in a mind-boggling 70 days.

Even more impressively, the NASA researchers predict that a trip to Alpha Centauri, the closest star system to our Solar System, would take just 92 years.


:ugeek: my body is ready
User avatar
beardmcdoug
 
Posts: 1093
Joined: Mon Sep 12, 2016 12:30 pm
Has thanked: 100 times
Been thanked: 79 times

Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby Buc2 » Fri Sep 23, 2016 9:56 am

My mind is ready. My body? Not so much.
Image
Don't tread on me
User avatar
Buc2
 
Posts: 6685
Joined: Wed Jan 14, 2015 2:16 pm
Location: America
Has thanked: 686 times
Been thanked: 224 times

Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby paco74 » Fri Sep 23, 2016 3:36 pm

mdb1958 wrote:Harold (Sonny) White, the leader of the research group at Eaglework, predicts that a crewed mission to Mars inside a 2 MegaWatt nuclear electric propulsion spacecraft, powered by an EM Drive with a thrust/power input of 0.4 Newton/kW, could get to Mars in a mind-boggling 70 days.

Even more impressively, the NASA researchers predict that a trip to Alpha Centauri, the closest star system to our Solar System, would take just 92 years.

Wow, that is not a huge amount of force. If my calculations are correct, the engine will provide only 800N of force, or 180lbf. At what rate tho? Well, I assume it is just a constant force so in space it would provide a constant acceleration which would build up to speeds well beyond what we have reached with the Voyager probes. All very cool and very exciting if it works!
Image
paco74
 
Posts: 648
Joined: Wed Jan 14, 2015 1:41 pm
Has thanked: 99 times
Been thanked: 43 times

Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby Nano » Fri Sep 23, 2016 3:43 pm

Pfft, I just went to Alpha Centauri in Elite Dangerous. Pretty boring place, and I think I died.
User avatar
Nano
 
Posts: 5646
Joined: Wed Jan 14, 2015 6:30 pm
Location: Somewhere above Tampa
Has thanked: 27 times
Been thanked: 199 times

Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby Buc2 » Tue Oct 04, 2016 12:07 pm

Rumors of potential sabotage are gathering around the investigation of the explosion during a recent SpaceX launch test.

SpaceX has been investigating the early September failure of a Falcon 9 rocket that caught fire and exploded on a Cape Canaveral launch pad just days before it was scheduled to launch.

The Washington Post reported on Friday that the inquiry has taken a "bizarre twist," suggesting SpaceX is considering sabotage a possible cause of the explosion. According to the Post, a SpaceX employee sought access to facilities belonging to SpaceX competitor United Launch Alliance — a partnership between Boeing and Lockheed Martin.

SpaceX investigators came across something suspicious when reviewing video of the failure—"an odd shadow and then a white spot" on the roof of a ULA building, according to the Post. A SpaceX employee seeking access to the building was turned away, but Air Force investigators later dispatched to the facility did not find anything on the roof.

SpaceX sent a statement CNBC saying that a "preliminary review of the data and debris suggests a breach in the second stage's helium system" on the Falcon 9, "but the cause of the breach is still unknown."

A ULA representative sent a statement to CNBC saying "ULA cooperated with the Air Force's 45th Space Wing, and nothing associated with the SpaceX accident was found."

SpaceX CEO Elon Musk has also expressed puzzlement at what might have caused the breach. Earlier this month he tweeted "Particularly trying to understand the quieter bang sound a few seconds before the fireball goes off. May come from rocket or something else."

More here...
Image
Don't tread on me
User avatar
Buc2
 
Posts: 6685
Joined: Wed Jan 14, 2015 2:16 pm
Location: America
Has thanked: 686 times
Been thanked: 224 times

Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby Buc2 » Tue Oct 25, 2016 10:20 am

Top speed I saw in the video was 181 mph in the long straight near the end of the run. ****. I wonder how much insurance will cost for this beast?
Hold on to your butts. The 2017 Chevrolet Camaro ZL1 lapped the Nurburgring in 7:29:60—and Chevy caught the whole event on video.

The Camaro ZL1 in question was kept almost entirely stock for its official timed run; the car was given a roll hoop, some Sparco six-point racing harnesses, and a more comprehensive suite of data-harvesting gear, but otherwise, it was the same 650-horsepower supercharged muscle car that’ll be landing in dealerships soon.

In another sign of the impending extinction of the manual transmission, the ‘Ring-record ZL1 was equipped with the GM’s new 10-speed automatic transmission developed in conjunction with Ford. Indeed, the transmission was even left to make its own decisions during the 7:32 run. (Hey, at least the stick shift should still win in the 0-60 race.)

As Chevrolet was more than happy to point out in the official press release, that 7:29.60 lap time is a full 11.67 seconds than the outgoing fifth-gen Camaro ZL1. But that sub-7:30 lap time also puts the 2017 Camaro ZL1 ahead of some serious metal. Both of the current contenders for the four-door ‘Ring lap crown, the Alfa Romeo Giulia Quadrifoglio and the Porsche Panamera Turbo, fall behind the maximum ‘Maro by a substantial margin. The Ferrari 458 Italia, the current Porsche 911 GT3, the Lexus LFA—all fall to the new Camaro. The time even puts the new ZL1 ahead of the outgoing track-monster Camaro Z/28, which ran the Nordschleife in 7:37.4 three years back.

It also puts the new ZL1 within spitting distance of some even crazier sports cars. Even in the hands of Walter Röhrl—yes, the Walter Röhrl—the Porsche Carrera GT was only able to run the ‘Ring in 7:28 flat.

While the official record may not be quite as impressive as the rumored 7:23 lap time, it’s still worth of high praise. The idea of a new Camaro setting any sort of decent ‘Ring time at all would have been laughable a decade ago; today, we live in a world where General Motors has built a muscle car that can outrun Porsches at the Nordschleife.

And not to immediately move onto the next thing, but this news has us even more charged up to see how quickly the new sixth-gen Camaro Z/28 will lap the German track.

Image
Don't tread on me
User avatar
Buc2
 
Posts: 6685
Joined: Wed Jan 14, 2015 2:16 pm
Location: America
Has thanked: 686 times
Been thanked: 224 times

Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby Mountaineer Buc » Tue Oct 25, 2016 10:50 am

Got up to 181 and almost lost control. Terrifying speed for a street vehicle.
Image
User avatar
Mountaineer Buc
 
Posts: 7412
Joined: Wed Jan 14, 2015 1:15 pm
Has thanked: 74 times
Been thanked: 431 times

Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby Buc2 » Tue Feb 07, 2017 10:13 am

Scientists have been trying to figure out how Mars could have ever been warm enough to have had liquid water on its surface. Well...turns out it wasn't CO2, so it's back to the drawing board.

The Curiosity rover has been cruising around on Mars since late 2012, so you’d think that scientists would have a pretty good handle on the kind of data it’s been sending back by now. However, some of the latest readings the rover has taken are totally contradicting many of the theories scientists have about Mars, and most notably when and how liquid water existed on its surface.

We — and by “we” I mean scientists that are way more intelligent than you or I — know few concrete things about Mars’ past, but one thing we’re sure of is that liquid water once existed on its surface. There’s been ample evidence to suggest it, and at this point it’s something most scientists assume as fact.

However, in order for liquid water to have existed on the surface of the red planet billions of years ago the conditions would have to have been warm enough, and the models that climate researchers rely on suggest it simply wouldn’t have been. So, a theory arose that perhaps Mars’ atmosphere was so thick with carbon dioxide that the planet was able to remain warm enough to support liquid water, thanks to a greenhouse effect. So with that theory in flux, the Curiosity rover set out to confirm it by sampling bedrock from an ancient lake, assuming it would find ample carbonate materials, thereby supporting the greenhouse warming theory. Well, it didn’t.

“We’ve been particularly struck with the absence of carbonate minerals in sedimentary rock the rover has examined,” NASA’s Thomas Bristow explains. “It would be really hard to get liquid water even if there were a hundred times more carbon dioxide in the atmosphere than what the mineral evidence in the rock tells us.”

Click on link above for more.
Last edited by Buc2 on Tue Feb 07, 2017 12:52 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Image
Don't tread on me
User avatar
Buc2
 
Posts: 6685
Joined: Wed Jan 14, 2015 2:16 pm
Location: America
Has thanked: 686 times
Been thanked: 224 times

Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby beardmcdoug » Tue Feb 07, 2017 12:26 pm

Buc2 wrote:Scientists have been trying to figure out how Mars could have ever been warm enough to have had liquid water on its surface. Well...turns out it was CO2, so it's back to the drawing board.

The Curiosity rover has been cruising around on Mars since late 2012, so you’d think that scientists would have a pretty good handle on the kind of data it’s been sending back by now. However, some of the latest readings the rover has taken are totally contradicting many of the theories scientists have about Mars, and most notably when and how liquid water existed on its surface.

We — and by “we” I mean scientists that are way more intelligent than you or I — know few concrete things about Mars’ past, but one thing we’re sure of is that liquid water once existed on its surface. There’s been ample evidence to suggest it, and at this point it’s something most scientists assume as fact.

However, in order for liquid water to have existed on the surface of the red planet billions of years ago the conditions would have to have been warm enough, and the models that climate researchers rely on suggest it simply wouldn’t have been. So, a theory arose that perhaps Mars’ atmosphere was so thick with carbon dioxide that the planet was able to remain warm enough to support liquid water, thanks to a greenhouse effect. So with that theory in flux, the Curiosity rover set out to confirm it by sampling bedrock from an ancient lake, assuming it would find ample carbonate materials, thereby supporting the greenhouse warming theory. Well, it didn’t.

“We’ve been particularly struck with the absence of carbonate minerals in sedimentary rock the rover has examined,” NASA’s Thomas Bristow explains. “It would be really hard to get liquid water even if there were a hundred times more carbon dioxide in the atmosphere than what the mineral evidence in the rock tells us.”

Click on link above for more.


Everything about this is cringe, including the article.

First, you said "Scientists have been trying to figure out how Mars could have ever been warm enough to have had liquid water on its surface."

... which is fine... but then you said:

"Well...turns out it was CO2, so it's back to the drawing board."

... which ... is your interpretation of the scientists' findings, which you got completely wrong... they actually found that, for now, they don't think it was CO2

Further, the scientists are/were GUESSING that once upon a time, Mars had a thick CO2 atmosphere... which is what you do in science, you just make guesses, based on what you know... and then you go investigate that. That's all they did with this CO2 theory; "hey, we know CO2 is one of the gases that can make a thick atmosphere and trap heat - and plus, if there was CO2 in the atmosphere, maybe it was respiration (like we and all other non-plant species do on the planet), and therefore life that made an ancient mars atmosphere! kill two birds with one stone!". This was not "NASA's "best and brightest" theory being tested, and on know its wrong, we know nothing now". It was a pretty basic question/sampling. I'm also curious about their sampling methods... does Curiosity even have the tools to bore down into the crust more than a couple inches/feet? What if the actual carboniferous debris/rock is buried meters deep, beneath thousands/millions of years of dust and rock that has been laid down over eons and eons? I think there's some inevitable limitations to sampling methods here... so I wouldn't write it all off and completely abandon the CO2 theory... then again, the scientists actually working on this are probably well aware of this and probably agree. We wouldn't know though, because this is some retarded click-bait style interpretation of a scientific event
User avatar
beardmcdoug
 
Posts: 1093
Joined: Mon Sep 12, 2016 12:30 pm
Has thanked: 100 times
Been thanked: 79 times

Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby Mountaineer Buc » Tue Feb 07, 2017 12:37 pm

Does this mean we can't terraform Mars?
Image
User avatar
Mountaineer Buc
 
Posts: 7412
Joined: Wed Jan 14, 2015 1:15 pm
Has thanked: 74 times
Been thanked: 431 times

Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby Buc2 » Tue Feb 07, 2017 12:53 pm

beardmcdoug wrote:
Buc2 wrote:Scientists have been trying to figure out how Mars could have ever been warm enough to have had liquid water on its surface. Well...turns out it was CO2, so it's back to the drawing board.



Everything about this is cringe, including the article.

First, you said "Scientists have been trying to figure out how Mars could have ever been warm enough to have had liquid water on its surface."

... which is fine... but then you said:

"Well...turns out it was CO2, so it's back to the drawing board."

... which ... is your interpretation of the scientists' findings, which you got completely wrong... they actually found that, for now, they don't think it was CO2

Further, the scientists are/were GUESSING that once upon a time, Mars had a thick CO2 atmosphere... which is what you do in science, you just make guesses, based on what you know... and then you go investigate that. That's all they did with this CO2 theory; "hey, we know CO2 is one of the gases that can make a thick atmosphere and trap heat - and plus, if there was CO2 in the atmosphere, maybe it was respiration (like we and all other non-plant species do on the planet), and therefore life that made an ancient mars atmosphere! kill two birds with one stone!". This was not "NASA's "best and brightest" theory being tested, and on know its wrong, we know nothing now". It was a pretty basic question/sampling. I'm also curious about their sampling methods... does Curiosity even have the tools to bore down into the crust more than a couple inches/feet? What if the actual carboniferous debris/rock is buried meters deep, beneath thousands/millions of years of dust and rock that has been laid down over eons and eons? I think there's some inevitable limitations to sampling methods here... so I wouldn't write it all off and completely abandon the CO2 theory... then again, the scientists actually working on this are probably well aware of this and probably agree. We wouldn't know though, because this is some retarded click-bait style interpretation of a scientific event

Relax. It was a ****ing typo on my part. I meant to say, "It turns out is wasN'T CO2." And, no ****, on the rest of what you said. I'm well aware of what science says CO2 in the atmosphere does. I was in no way trying to imply anything about the science being wrong. Folks around here have got to have some of the thinnest skin I've ever see.
Image
Don't tread on me
User avatar
Buc2
 
Posts: 6685
Joined: Wed Jan 14, 2015 2:16 pm
Location: America
Has thanked: 686 times
Been thanked: 224 times

Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby Nano » Tue Feb 07, 2017 4:44 pm

Mountaineer Buc wrote:Does this mean we can't terraform Mars?

We just have to wait until the Rover finds The Traveler somewhere over there.
User avatar
Nano
 
Posts: 5646
Joined: Wed Jan 14, 2015 6:30 pm
Location: Somewhere above Tampa
Has thanked: 27 times
Been thanked: 199 times

Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby Buc2 » Wed Feb 08, 2017 10:58 am

I'll try not to commit a typo this time.

This week in 1984, NASA astronaut, Bruce McCandless, showed some major cojones when he completed the first untethered space walk.

Image
STS-41-B was the tenth NASA Space Shuttle mission and the fourth flight of the Space Shuttle Challenger. It launched on February 3, 1984, and landed on February 11 after deploying two communications satellites. It was also notable for including the first untethered spacewalk.
Image
Don't tread on me
User avatar
Buc2
 
Posts: 6685
Joined: Wed Jan 14, 2015 2:16 pm
Location: America
Has thanked: 686 times
Been thanked: 224 times

Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby Kress » Wed Feb 08, 2017 11:44 am

Buc2 wrote:untethered spacewalk.



Let me go ahead and say what every guy with even marginally large balls is thinking.


**** THAT.


I am not even a big fan of heights. Cut me loose in space? Not a fan.

I guess it was one of those "trust the nerds and do it" things, but ****. BALLS.
Image
User avatar
Kress
 
Posts: 2707
Joined: Wed Jan 14, 2015 12:26 pm
Has thanked: 21 times
Been thanked: 185 times

Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby Mountaineer Buc » Wed Feb 08, 2017 4:57 pm

Yeah, I'd be freaking out like John Lithgow in 2010.
Image
User avatar
Mountaineer Buc
 
Posts: 7412
Joined: Wed Jan 14, 2015 1:15 pm
Has thanked: 74 times
Been thanked: 431 times

Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby paco74 » Thu Feb 09, 2017 8:44 am

Kress wrote:
Buc2 wrote:untethered spacewalk.



Let me go ahead and say what every guy with even marginally large balls is thinking.


**** THAT.


I am not even a big fan of heights. Cut me loose in space? Not a fan.

I guess it was one of those "trust the nerds and do it" things, but ****. BALLS.

Which is why I disliked the movie Gravity. Seeing Clooney, aka mission ****ing commander, goofing around on a jet pack. I mean, really?! Hey, lets change course heading by a few degrees by doing a 15 second blast...in a vacuum. No **** you slammed into the object really hard. I don't know who was the science adviser for the movie but they were an epic fail.
Image
paco74
 
Posts: 648
Joined: Wed Jan 14, 2015 1:41 pm
Has thanked: 99 times
Been thanked: 43 times

Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby paco74 » Thu Feb 09, 2017 8:47 am

Image
paco74
 
Posts: 648
Joined: Wed Jan 14, 2015 1:41 pm
Has thanked: 99 times
Been thanked: 43 times

Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby Buc2 » Thu Feb 09, 2017 9:06 am


The comments are fun reads as well.
Image
Don't tread on me
User avatar
Buc2
 
Posts: 6685
Joined: Wed Jan 14, 2015 2:16 pm
Location: America
Has thanked: 686 times
Been thanked: 224 times

Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby beardmcdoug » Mon Feb 13, 2017 3:18 pm

Buc2 wrote:
beardmcdoug wrote:
Everything about this is cringe, including the article.

First, you said "Scientists have been trying to figure out how Mars could have ever been warm enough to have had liquid water on its surface."

... which is fine... but then you said:

"Well...turns out it was CO2, so it's back to the drawing board."

... which ... is your interpretation of the scientists' findings, which you got completely wrong... they actually found that, for now, they don't think it was CO2

Further, the scientists are/were GUESSING that once upon a time, Mars had a thick CO2 atmosphere... which is what you do in science, you just make guesses, based on what you know... and then you go investigate that. That's all they did with this CO2 theory; "hey, we know CO2 is one of the gases that can make a thick atmosphere and trap heat - and plus, if there was CO2 in the atmosphere, maybe it was respiration (like we and all other non-plant species do on the planet), and therefore life that made an ancient mars atmosphere! kill two birds with one stone!". This was not "NASA's "best and brightest" theory being tested, and on know its wrong, we know nothing now". It was a pretty basic question/sampling. I'm also curious about their sampling methods... does Curiosity even have the tools to bore down into the crust more than a couple inches/feet? What if the actual carboniferous debris/rock is buried meters deep, beneath thousands/millions of years of dust and rock that has been laid down over eons and eons? I think there's some inevitable limitations to sampling methods here... so I wouldn't write it all off and completely abandon the CO2 theory... then again, the scientists actually working on this are probably well aware of this and probably agree. We wouldn't know though, because this is some retarded click-bait style interpretation of a scientific event

Relax. It was a ****ing typo on my part. I meant to say, "It turns out is wasN'T CO2." And, no ****, on the rest of what you said. I'm well aware of what science says CO2 in the atmosphere does. I was in no way trying to imply anything about the science being wrong. Folks around here have got to have some of the thinnest skin I've ever see.


lol DONT MAKE THAT MISTAKE AGAIN :mrgreen:
User avatar
beardmcdoug
 
Posts: 1093
Joined: Mon Sep 12, 2016 12:30 pm
Has thanked: 100 times
Been thanked: 79 times

Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby Buc2 » Mon Feb 13, 2017 3:24 pm

beardmcdoug wrote:
Buc2 wrote:Relax. It was a ****ing typo on my part. I meant to say, "It turns out is wasN'T CO2." And, no ****, on the rest of what you said. I'm well aware of what science says CO2 in the atmosphere does. I was in no way trying to imply anything about the science being wrong. Folks around here have got to have some of the thinnest skin I've ever see.


lol DONT MAKE THAT MISTAKE AGAIN :mrgreen:

I always try to proof read what I type before posting, but I guess it's true what they say... One should never proofread their own writing because they will inevitably miss something. {sigh}
Image
Don't tread on me
User avatar
Buc2
 
Posts: 6685
Joined: Wed Jan 14, 2015 2:16 pm
Location: America
Has thanked: 686 times
Been thanked: 224 times

Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby Buc2 » Thu Feb 16, 2017 1:25 pm

SpaceX readies for second launch of the year, this time from Florida

When SpaceX’s second orbital launch of the year blasts off from its new Florida launchpad this weekend, it will be carrying a 5,500-pound payload of cutting-edge medical, climate and Earth science research materials to NASA’s International Space Station.

Image
SpaceX’s Falcon 9 rocket stands at its new East Coast base, Kennedy
Space Center Launch Complex 39-A, ready for a Saturday trip into orbit.
The launchpad is the site of former Apollo and space shuttle launches.
(Credit: SpaceX)


If successful, this will be the Hawthorne commercial rocket maker’s 10th space station resupply mission for NASA.

Officials with SpaceX, fully named Space Exploration Technologies Corp., said they expect to launch twice monthly through the rest of the year as they play catch-up with delayed contracted deliveries.

The Falcon 9 rocket is expected to leave at 10:01 a.m. Saturday if weather permits and if the Federal Aviation Administration sanctions the mission. It is flying from its new pad 39A at Cape Canaveral’s Kennedy Space Center, originally built for the Apollo program and later used to hoist space shuttles.

The company’s former East Coast launchpad was badly damaged in a Sept. 1 explosion caused by chilled propellant overwhelming a holding tank as the rocket fueled up for a prelaunch static-fire test.

A Sunday static-fire test for this weekend’s planned launch was successful.

The two-stage rocket is fitted with a Dragon spacecraft at its nose that’s filled with nearly three tons of cargo. The load is set to be handed off to six astronauts and cosmonauts from the U.S., Russia and Europe living aboard the station’s orbiting laboratory as part of Expedition 50.

NASA’s Shane Kimbrough and European Space Agency’s Thomas Pesquet “will use the station’s robotic arm to capture Dragon when it arrives on station,” according to a NASA statement. “The spacecraft will be berthed to the Earth-facing port on the Harmony module.”

Research supplies awaiting delivery include cancer-fighting antibodies, a device that analyzes bacterial mutations, stem cells, a lightning sensor, a next-generation spacecraft navigation system, a machine that can measure stratospheric gases like ozone, and materials for a study trying to understand how humans can better regenerate tissue.

The company’s West Coast launchpad, at Vandenberg Air Force Base near Lompoc, was the site of a flawless post-explosion return to flight on Jan. 14. That mission, a communications satellite delivery for Iridium Communications Inc., was the first of a series of satellite deliveries for the company.

After that January delivery, the Falcon 9’s first-stage booster returned to Earth and landed near San Diego on an at-sea barge named Just Read the Instructions. A tugboat then carried it to its parking and off-loading site at the Port of Los Angeles in San Pedro’s outer harbor.

The company expanded its leased parking spot in the port earlier this month. It plans to recover boosters from at least seven more West Coast flights through 2018. The equipment will be held in San Pedro until it’s ready to be transported by truck to Hawthorne or Texas facilities for testing.

The rocket equipment is intended for reuse on a later flight, part of SpaceX CEO Elon Musk’s plan to make spaceflight affordable. This weekend’s planned launch also has a secondary mission of delivering the booster stage intact to a landing pad.
Image
Don't tread on me
User avatar
Buc2
 
Posts: 6685
Joined: Wed Jan 14, 2015 2:16 pm
Location: America
Has thanked: 686 times
Been thanked: 224 times

Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby Buc2 » Mon Feb 20, 2017 12:42 pm

Image
Don't tread on me
User avatar
Buc2
 
Posts: 6685
Joined: Wed Jan 14, 2015 2:16 pm
Location: America
Has thanked: 686 times
Been thanked: 224 times

Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby Buc2 » Wed Feb 22, 2017 1:27 pm

Astronomers discover 7 potentially habitable exoplanets orbiting nearby dwarf star

Image

An international team of astronomers has discovered seven potentially habitable exoplanets -- or planets outside our solar system -- that could have liquid water on their surfaces, according to a paper published Wednesday in the journal Nature.

It is unclear whether any of the newly discovered planets can harbor life. However, scientists pointed out that the new planetary system orbits TRAPPIST-1, a dwarf star that is much younger than our sun and that will continue to burn for another 10 trillion years -- more than 700 times longer than the universe has existed so far.

Astronomers said that is "arguably enough time for life to evolve," the article reported.

TRAPPIST-1 is about 39 light-years away, in the constellation Aquarius.

The seven newly discovered planets orbiting TRAPPIST-1 have been nicknamed "Earth's seven sisters" and have masses similar to that of Earth's, in addition to having rocky compositions like our planet, scientists said.

Astronomers noted, though, that they are awaiting the scheduled launch of NASA's James Webb Space Telescope in 2018 to confirm what conditions -- such as atmospheric composition and climate -- are like on the exoplanets. The James Webb Space Telescope is expected to be significantly more powerful than the Hubble Space Telescope.

The discovery of the new planetary system has also indicated that Earth-sized planets are much more abundant and common in the Milky Way galaxy than previously thought, researchers said.

The international team of astronomers that discovered the new exoplanets said they will be ramping up their efforts to locate and identify other planets around small stars in the vicinity of our sun through project Search for Habitable Planets Eclipsing Ultra-Cool Stars (SPECULOOS).

Additionally, NASA said it plans to launch the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS), a space telescope that will spend two years finding planets orbiting over 200,000 of the brightest stars in the sky.
Image
Don't tread on me
User avatar
Buc2
 
Posts: 6685
Joined: Wed Jan 14, 2015 2:16 pm
Location: America
Has thanked: 686 times
Been thanked: 224 times

Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby paco74 » Wed Feb 22, 2017 3:53 pm

I read an article earlier today about Trappist-1. Says it is only 327 trillion miles away...only. But, in the grand scheme of the universe, it is a close neighbor. In one of the constellations I believe.
Image
paco74
 
Posts: 648
Joined: Wed Jan 14, 2015 1:41 pm
Has thanked: 99 times
Been thanked: 43 times

Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby Nano » Wed Feb 22, 2017 4:08 pm

Some of the NASA guys are doing an AMA on Reddit if anyone's interested

https://www.reddit.com/r/IAmA/comments/5vkoyd/were_nasa_scientists_exoplanet_experts_ask_us/
User avatar
Nano
 
Posts: 5646
Joined: Wed Jan 14, 2015 6:30 pm
Location: Somewhere above Tampa
Has thanked: 27 times
Been thanked: 199 times

Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby Buc2 » Wed Feb 22, 2017 4:40 pm

paco74 wrote:I read an article earlier today about Trappist-1. Says it is only 327 trillion miles away...only. But, in the grand scheme of the universe, it is a close neighbor. In one of the constellations I believe.

Pfft! At warp factor 6, this system is only a mere 65 days away.
Image
Don't tread on me
User avatar
Buc2
 
Posts: 6685
Joined: Wed Jan 14, 2015 2:16 pm
Location: America
Has thanked: 686 times
Been thanked: 224 times

Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby DreadNaught » Wed Feb 22, 2017 10:01 pm

This is potentially significant news right?

I heard these planets are closer together to one another than we are to our sun, or maybe it would seem that way based on their relative to one another.

Either way, very cool...
Image
User avatar
DreadNaught
 
Posts: 8020
Joined: Thu Jan 15, 2015 9:18 am
Has thanked: 328 times
Been thanked: 335 times

Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby Mountaineer Buc » Thu Feb 23, 2017 7:04 am

Buc2 wrote:
paco74 wrote:I read an article earlier today about Trappist-1. Says it is only 327 trillion miles away...only. But, in the grand scheme of the universe, it is a close neighbor. In one of the constellations I believe.

Pfft! At warp factor 6, this system is only a mere 65 days away.

Somebody used a warp speed calculator.

Step it up to warp 8 and you can get there in 27.8 days. But you are going to need one of the better starships. Preferably a constitution class.
Image
User avatar
Mountaineer Buc
 
Posts: 7412
Joined: Wed Jan 14, 2015 1:15 pm
Has thanked: 74 times
Been thanked: 431 times

PreviousNext

post

Return to Off Topic

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Buc You, Deja Entendu, Noles1724, Yahoo [Bot] and 4 guests