The Science & Technology Thread

General Discussion on any Off Topic subject
post

Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby Kress » Fri Jun 17, 2016 11:21 am

I don't even necessarily read that as "miappropriation." The article says that stuff became obsolete or unusable. That doesn't mean that it wasn't proper to order it originally.

If I buy a banana, and it goes bad, that doesn't mean that I misappropriated my money when I went shopping. It just turned out that I didn't use the banana.
Image
User avatar
Kress
 
Posts: 3252
Joined: Wed Jan 14, 2015 12:26 pm
Has thanked: 30 times
Been thanked: 201 times

Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby Buc2 » Tue Jul 05, 2016 7:39 am

NASA's Juno Spacecraft Enters Jupiter's Orbit After 5-Year Journey

We're about to get a closer look at Jupiter than ever before.

Image

After five years and a nearly 2 billion mile journey through the solar system, NASA's Juno probe has entered Jupiter's orbit late Monday, getting an unprecedented front-row view of the gas giant -- our solar system's largest planet.

Ground controllers at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory erupted in applause when the solar-powered spacecraft beamed home the news it had entered the planet's orbit.

"Juno, welcome to Jupiter," said mission control commentator Jennifer Delavan of Lockheed Martin, which built Juno.

The four-ton Juno launched on Aug. 5, 2011, and is equipped with three 30-foot-long solar arrays, along with 18,696 individual solar cells, to help it make the most of the solar power it receives on its journey.

The spacecraft conducted a 35-minute burn of its main engine Monday, essentially hitting the brakes and slowing Juno by about 1,200 mph so it can enter Jupiter's polar orbit.

Once inserted into Jupiter's orbit, Juno will circle the giant planet a total of 37 times over the course of 20 months. During that time, Juno is set to come as close as 3,000 feet above Jupiter's cloud tops, getting our closest look ever at the planet.

The Juno probe gets its name from the Roman goddess and wife of Jupiter who was able to see through clouds.

NASA officials said they hope the mission will help scientists learn more about Jupiter's origins, structure, atmosphere and magnetosphere.


Follow on Twitter: https://twitter.com/NASA
Image
Don't tread on me
User avatar
Buc2
 
Posts: 7554
Joined: Wed Jan 14, 2015 2:16 pm
Location: America
Has thanked: 715 times
Been thanked: 255 times

Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby Nano » Tue Jul 05, 2016 11:53 pm

The Juno engineers/scientist did a AMA on Reddit yesterday. It was an interesting read.
User avatar
Nano
 
Posts: 6254
Joined: Wed Jan 14, 2015 6:30 pm
Location: Somewhere above Tampa
Has thanked: 28 times
Been thanked: 217 times

Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby Alpha » Fri Jul 08, 2016 1:50 am

Corsair wrote:
Kress wrote:
Is another air craft carrier really all that valuable compared to these issues... well, that's debatable.


No...it's really not.
Alpha
 
Posts: 2638
Joined: Tue Feb 17, 2015 12:51 am
Location: St. Pete
Has thanked: 1 time
Been thanked: 77 times

Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby Buc2 » Wed Aug 03, 2016 11:17 am

Private company wins U.S. clearance to fly to the moon
By Irene Klotz August 3, 2016

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (Reuters) - A Florida-based company won U.S. government permission on Wednesday to send a robotic lander to the moon next year, the firm's founder said, marking the first time the United States has cleared a private space mission to fly beyond Earth’s orbit.

The Federal Aviation Administration's unprecedented go-ahead for the Moon Express mission also sets a legal and regulatory framework for a host of other commercial expeditions to the moon, asteroids and Mars.

As approved by the FAA's Office of Commercial Space Transportation, the privately held Moon Express, headquartered in Cape Canaveral, plans to fly a suitcase-sized lander to the moon for a two-week mission in 2017, said the company founder and chief executive Bob Richards.

The spacecraft will carry a number of science experiments and some commercial cargo on its one-way trip to the lunar surface, including cremated human remains, and will beam back pictures and video to Earth, the company said.

Before now, no government agency was recognized as having authority to oversee private missions beyond Earth's orbit, though a 1967 international treaty holds the United States responsible for any flights into space by its non-government entities.

So far, only government agencies have flown spacecraft beyond the orbit of the Earth.

To address the conundrum, the FAA, which already exercises jurisdiction over commercial rocket launches in the United States, led an interagency review of the Moon Express proposal, which included steps the company would take to ensure compliance with the 1967 Outer Space Treaty.

“It’s been a very steep mountain,” Richards said in a telephone interview. “We had to lay the track at the same time that we wanted to do the mission.”

Other companies are expected to soon follow the same framework.

Elon Musk, founder and chief executive of Space Exploration Technologies, plans to fly a spacecraft to Mars in 2018, a mission that raises a host of issues dealing with protecting potential indigenous life on the planet from contamination by Earth microbes.

Among other private space ventures in the works are missions to mine asteroids, operate science labs and repair and service satellites.

Planetary protection is less of a concern on the moon, but Moon Express did have to contend with concerns about disturbing Apollo and other historic lunar landing sites, among other issues.

“We proposed a scenario that built on the existing FAA mission-approval framework," Richards said.

NASA and other agencies, including the Defense, State and Commerce departments, ultimately agreed that no new law was necessary, Richards said.

As part of the agreement, NASA will advise, but not regulate, Moon Express activities on the lunar surface.
Image
Don't tread on me
User avatar
Buc2
 
Posts: 7554
Joined: Wed Jan 14, 2015 2:16 pm
Location: America
Has thanked: 715 times
Been thanked: 255 times

Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby Kress » Wed Aug 03, 2016 1:22 pm

Why did I get quoted for that carrier comment? I never said that....
Image
User avatar
Kress
 
Posts: 3252
Joined: Wed Jan 14, 2015 12:26 pm
Has thanked: 30 times
Been thanked: 201 times

Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby Buc2 » Sat Aug 13, 2016 8:22 pm

EARTH-LIKE PLANET AROUND PROXIMA CENTAURI DISCOVERED
Article Updated: 13 Aug , 2016
by Matt Williams

The hunt for exoplanets has been heating up in recent years. Since it began its mission in 2009, over four thousand exoplanet candidates discovered by the Kepler mission, several hundred of which have been confirmed to be “Earth-like” (i.e. terrestrial). And of these, some 216 planets have been shown to be both terrestrial and located within their parent star’s habitable zone (aka. “Goldilocks zone”).

But in what may prove to be the most exciting find to date, the German weekly Der Spiegel announced recently that astronomers have discovered an Earth like planet orbiting Proxima Centauri, just 4.25 light-years away. Yes, in what is an apparent trifecta, this newly-discovered exoplanet is Earth-like, orbits within it’s sun’s habitable zone, and is within our reach. But is this too good to be true?

For over a century, astronomers have known about Proxima Centauri and believed that it is likely to be part of a trinary star system (along with Alpha Centauri A and B). Located just 0.237 ± 0.011 light years from the binary pair, this low-mass red dwarf star is also 0.12 light years (~7590 AUs) closer to Earth, making it the closest star system to our own.

In the past, the Kepler mission has revealed several Earth-like exoplanets that were deemed to be likely habitable. And recently, an international team of researchers narrowed the number of potentially-habitable exoplanets in the Kepler catalog down to the 20 that are most likely to support life. However, in just about all cases, these planets are hundreds (if not thousands) of light years away from Earth.

Knowing that there is a habitable planet that a mission from Earth could reach within our own lifetimes is nothing short of amazing! But of course, there is reason to be skeptical. Citing anomalous sources, the magazine stated:
“The still nameless planet is believed to be Earth-like and orbits at a distance to Proxima Centauri that could allow it to have liquid water on its surface — an important requirement for the emergence of life. Never before have scientists discovered a second Earth that is so close by.”

In addition, they claim that the discovery was made by the European Southern Observatory (ESO) using the La Silla Observatory‘s reflecting telescope. Coincidentally, it was this same observatory that announced the discovery of Alpha Centauri Bb back in 2012, which was also declared to be “the closest exoplanet to Earth”. Unfortunately, subsequent analysis cast doubt on its existence, claiming it was a spurious artifact of the data analysis.

However, according to Der Spiegel’s unnamed source – whom they claim was involved with the La Silla team that made the find – this latest discovery is the real deal, and was the result of intensive work. “Finding small celestial bodies is a lot of hard work,” the source was quoted as saying. “We were moving at the technically feasible limit of measurement.”

The article goes on to state that the European Southern Observatory (ESO) will be announcing the finding at the end of August. But according to numerous sources, in response to a request for comment by AFP, ESO spokesman Richard Hook refused to confirm or deny the discovery of an exoplanet around Proxima Centauri. “We are not making any comment,” he is reported as saying.

Naturally, there is the desire (especially amongst exoplanet enthusiasts) to intepret the ESO’s refusal to comment either way as a sort of tacit confirmation. But of course, that would be entirely premature. If the statements made by the unnamed source, and quoted by Der Speigel, are to be taken at face value, then confirmation (or denial) will be coming shortly. In the meantime, we’ll all just need to be patient.

Still, you have to admit, it’s an exciting prospect: an Earth-like planet that’s actually within reach! Should it prove to be true, I imagine Project Starshot will be reassessing its proposed mission to Alpha Centauri. Instead of sending their nanocraft to this system to have a look around, perhaps it should be going to Proxima Centauri to look specifically at this maybe-planet. Would certainly make for some interesting findings!
Image
Don't tread on me
User avatar
Buc2
 
Posts: 7554
Joined: Wed Jan 14, 2015 2:16 pm
Location: America
Has thanked: 715 times
Been thanked: 255 times

Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby Buc2 » Wed Aug 24, 2016 12:42 pm

Doctors have woken a coma patient for the first time ever by jump-starting his brain using a pioneering ultrasound technique.

A saucer-sized device was put against the side of the 25-year-old patient’s head over a 10 minute period.
Each of the 10 half-minute, low-intensity pulses created acoustic energy to stimulate brain tissue.

The patient’s responses improved measurably within 24 hours. In three days he was fully conscious and had complete language comprehension.

He could nod his head “yes” or shake his head “no.” He even made a fist-bump gesture to say goodbye to one of his doctors.
The unnamed man, who had shown only minimal signs of being conscious before the treatment at University of California, Los Angeles, has made “remarkable” progress since.

The ultrasound wakes brain nerve cells in the thalamus, which controls movement and consciousness.

The breakthrough, reported in medical journal Brain Stimulation, may lead to the development of a low-cost, helmet-like, ­portable device to wake patients.
Image
Don't tread on me
User avatar
Buc2
 
Posts: 7554
Joined: Wed Jan 14, 2015 2:16 pm
Location: America
Has thanked: 715 times
Been thanked: 255 times

Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby Buc2 » Wed Aug 24, 2016 12:44 pm

If this turns out to be true, that would be some great news.

Great Barrier Reef tourist operators found less than 5 percent of the natural wonder has died off from “bleaching,” despite claims from scientists that most of the reef had been killed off by the effects of global warming. “Scientists had written off that entire northern section as a complete white-out,’’ Chris Eade, owner of the diving boat Spirit Of Freedom, told The Courier-Mail in an interview. “We expected the worst,” Eade said. “But it is tremendous condition, most of it is pristine, the rest is in full recovery. It shows the resilience of the reef.”
Image
Don't tread on me
User avatar
Buc2
 
Posts: 7554
Joined: Wed Jan 14, 2015 2:16 pm
Location: America
Has thanked: 715 times
Been thanked: 255 times

Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby uscbucsfan » Wed Aug 24, 2016 8:46 pm

It sounds like they want tourists to come back...
Image
User avatar
uscbucsfan
 
Posts: 2449
Joined: Wed Jan 14, 2015 1:21 pm
Has thanked: 63 times
Been thanked: 68 times

Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby Buc2 » Thu Aug 25, 2016 8:41 am

uscbucsfan wrote:It sounds like they want tourists to come back...

I'm sure that's it.
Image
Don't tread on me
User avatar
Buc2
 
Posts: 7554
Joined: Wed Jan 14, 2015 2:16 pm
Location: America
Has thanked: 715 times
Been thanked: 255 times

Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby DreadNaught » Thu Aug 25, 2016 9:05 am

Buc2 wrote:
EARTH-LIKE PLANET AROUND PROXIMA CENTAURI DISCOVERED
Article Updated: 13 Aug , 2016
by Matt Williams

The hunt for exoplanets has been heating up in recent years. Since it began its mission in 2009, over four thousand exoplanet candidates discovered by the Kepler mission, several hundred of which have been confirmed to be “Earth-like” (i.e. terrestrial). And of these, some 216 planets have been shown to be both terrestrial and located within their parent star’s habitable zone (aka. “Goldilocks zone”).

But in what may prove to be the most exciting find to date, the German weekly Der Spiegel announced recently that astronomers have discovered an Earth like planet orbiting Proxima Centauri, just 4.25 light-years away. Yes, in what is an apparent trifecta, this newly-discovered exoplanet is Earth-like, orbits within it’s sun’s habitable zone, and is within our reach. But is this too good to be true?

For over a century, astronomers have known about Proxima Centauri and believed that it is likely to be part of a trinary star system (along with Alpha Centauri A and B). Located just 0.237 ± 0.011 light years from the binary pair, this low-mass red dwarf star is also 0.12 light years (~7590 AUs) closer to Earth, making it the closest star system to our own.

In the past, the Kepler mission has revealed several Earth-like exoplanets that were deemed to be likely habitable. And recently, an international team of researchers narrowed the number of potentially-habitable exoplanets in the Kepler catalog down to the 20 that are most likely to support life. However, in just about all cases, these planets are hundreds (if not thousands) of light years away from Earth.

Knowing that there is a habitable planet that a mission from Earth could reach within our own lifetimes is nothing short of amazing! But of course, there is reason to be skeptical. Citing anomalous sources, the magazine stated:

In addition, they claim that the discovery was made by the European Southern Observatory (ESO) using the La Silla Observatory‘s reflecting telescope. Coincidentally, it was this same observatory that announced the discovery of Alpha Centauri Bb back in 2012, which was also declared to be “the closest exoplanet to Earth”. Unfortunately, subsequent analysis cast doubt on its existence, claiming it was a spurious artifact of the data analysis.

However, according to Der Spiegel’s unnamed source – whom they claim was involved with the La Silla team that made the find – this latest discovery is the real deal, and was the result of intensive work. “Finding small celestial bodies is a lot of hard work,” the source was quoted as saying. “We were moving at the technically feasible limit of measurement.”

The article goes on to state that the European Southern Observatory (ESO) will be announcing the finding at the end of August. But according to numerous sources, in response to a request for comment by AFP, ESO spokesman Richard Hook refused to confirm or deny the discovery of an exoplanet around Proxima Centauri. “We are not making any comment,” he is reported as saying.

Naturally, there is the desire (especially amongst exoplanet enthusiasts) to intepret the ESO’s refusal to comment either way as a sort of tacit confirmation. But of course, that would be entirely premature. If the statements made by the unnamed source, and quoted by Der Speigel, are to be taken at face value, then confirmation (or denial) will be coming shortly. In the meantime, we’ll all just need to be patient.

Still, you have to admit, it’s an exciting prospect: an Earth-like planet that’s actually within reach! Should it prove to be true, I imagine Project Starshot will be reassessing its proposed mission to Alpha Centauri. Instead of sending their nanocraft to this system to have a look around, perhaps it should be going to Proxima Centauri to look specifically at this maybe-planet. Would certainly make for some interesting findings!


Very cool.
Image
User avatar
DreadNaught
 
Posts: 9228
Joined: Thu Jan 15, 2015 9:18 am
Has thanked: 371 times
Been thanked: 374 times

Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby Buc2 » Thu Aug 25, 2016 12:28 pm

DreadNaught wrote:
Buc2 wrote:


Very cool.


It's now been confirmed and a news conference was held a couple days ago to formally announce the finding.
http://www.space.com/33834-discovery-of ... ima-b.html
Image
Don't tread on me
User avatar
Buc2
 
Posts: 7554
Joined: Wed Jan 14, 2015 2:16 pm
Location: America
Has thanked: 715 times
Been thanked: 255 times

Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby Buc2 » Wed Aug 31, 2016 3:52 pm

This could be a game changer.
A revolutionary drug that could stop people from ever developing Alzheimer’s disease has been unveiled by scientists.

Trials have produced ‘unprecedented’ results and the medicine has been hailed as a potential game-changer in the fight against the cruel disease.

In future, healthy pensioners could be prescribed the drug to ward off dementia, in much the same way as statins are given today to those at risk of heart attacks.

One British expert described the drug, which is about to be tested in hospitals around the UK, as the best yet, others called it ‘ingenious’ work with ‘tantalising’ results.

And a US doctor hailed it as the best news in his 25-year career.
Image
Don't tread on me
User avatar
Buc2
 
Posts: 7554
Joined: Wed Jan 14, 2015 2:16 pm
Location: America
Has thanked: 715 times
Been thanked: 255 times

Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby Buc2 » Thu Sep 01, 2016 12:09 pm

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket exploded on its pad during a test Thursday morning at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. No one was injured.

Witnesses reported seeing a fireball, hearing multiple explosions, feeling shock waves in buildings several miles away at Kennedy Space Center and seeing a plume of smoke rising from Launch Complex 40 just after 9 a.m.

“SpaceX can confirm that in preparation for today's static fire, there was an anomaly on the pad resulting in the loss of the vehicle and its payload," SpaceX said in a statement. "Per standard procedure, the pad was clear and there were no injuries.”

Image

The rocket was preparing for a test-firing of its nine Merlin main engines as a standard check of their readiness for launch, and the area was cleared for that hazardous operation.

The rocket was scheduled to launch the Amos-6 communications satellite for Israeli company Spacecom at 3 a.m. Saturday.

The Air Force's 45th Space Wing confirmed an explosion occurred at 9:07 a.m. It was not immediately clear if the failure began on the rocket or ground equipment.

The satellite built by Israel Aerospace Industries also was destroyed.

Continued...


Facebook had planned to use some of the satellite's capacity to expand its Internet.org initiative in Africa.
Image
Don't tread on me
User avatar
Buc2
 
Posts: 7554
Joined: Wed Jan 14, 2015 2:16 pm
Location: America
Has thanked: 715 times
Been thanked: 255 times

Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby Kress » Thu Sep 01, 2016 4:00 pm

There is a video of it on YouTube but can't link from my phone. Pretty impressive.
Image
User avatar
Kress
 
Posts: 3252
Joined: Wed Jan 14, 2015 12:26 pm
Has thanked: 30 times
Been thanked: 201 times

Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby Buc2 » Fri Sep 02, 2016 12:12 pm

Cresselia wrote:There is a video of it on YouTube but can't link from my phone. Pretty impressive.


Got it. Starts at the 1:11 mark. Damn!



At about the 1:28 mark, it looks like that's when the shock wave hit the camera location.
Image
Don't tread on me
User avatar
Buc2
 
Posts: 7554
Joined: Wed Jan 14, 2015 2:16 pm
Location: America
Has thanked: 715 times
Been thanked: 255 times

Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby Noles1724 » Fri Sep 02, 2016 12:34 pm

Buc2 wrote:
Cresselia wrote:There is a video of it on YouTube but can't link from my phone. Pretty impressive.


Got it. Starts at the 1:11 mark. Damn!



At about the 1:28 mark, it looks like that's when the shock wave hit the camera location.


odd.. I thought for sure the tower that the explosion occurred on would have fallen.
Image
Noles1724
 
Posts: 1535
Joined: Wed Jan 14, 2015 1:15 pm
Has thanked: 74 times
Been thanked: 56 times

Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby Kress » Fri Sep 02, 2016 3:42 pm

They are saying an "anomaly" on the pad. So.... what you are saying is that this wasn't supposed to happen?
Image
User avatar
Kress
 
Posts: 3252
Joined: Wed Jan 14, 2015 12:26 pm
Has thanked: 30 times
Been thanked: 201 times

Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby Kress » Fri Sep 02, 2016 3:45 pm

Noles1724 wrote:
Buc2 wrote:
Got it. Starts at the 1:11 mark. Damn!



At about the 1:28 mark, it looks like that's when the shock wave hit the camera location.


odd.. I thought for sure the tower that the explosion occurred on would have fallen.



Not made in China.
Image
User avatar
Kress
 
Posts: 3252
Joined: Wed Jan 14, 2015 12:26 pm
Has thanked: 30 times
Been thanked: 201 times

Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby paco74 » Thu Sep 08, 2016 2:04 pm

"The 'impossible' EM Drive is about to be tested in space"

http://www.sciencealert.com/the-impossible-em-drive-is-about-to-be-tested-in-space
Image
paco74
 
Posts: 687
Joined: Wed Jan 14, 2015 1:41 pm
Has thanked: 109 times
Been thanked: 45 times

Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby Buc2 » Thu Sep 08, 2016 2:17 pm

paco74 wrote:"The 'impossible' EM Drive is about to be tested in space"

http://www.sciencealert.com/the-impossible-em-drive-is-about-to-be-tested-in-space


I hadn't heard about an EM Drive before. If it works, that will be seriously cool.
Image
Don't tread on me
User avatar
Buc2
 
Posts: 7554
Joined: Wed Jan 14, 2015 2:16 pm
Location: America
Has thanked: 715 times
Been thanked: 255 times

Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby RedLeader » Thu Sep 08, 2016 9:45 pm

Yeah, but how fast can it do the Kessel Run?
User avatar
RedLeader
 
Posts: 1726
Joined: Wed Jan 14, 2015 3:27 pm
Has thanked: 50 times
Been thanked: 68 times

Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby DreadNaught » Thu Sep 08, 2016 11:55 pm

RedLeader wrote:Yeah, but how fast can it do the Kessel Run?


Not less than 12 parsecs. That's for sure.
Image
User avatar
DreadNaught
 
Posts: 9228
Joined: Thu Jan 15, 2015 9:18 am
Has thanked: 371 times
Been thanked: 374 times

Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby Buc2 » Fri Sep 09, 2016 7:58 am

The U.S. Navy’s Largest, Most Expensive, and Most Advanced Destroyer Ever Leaves Shipyard
September 8, 2016 by Mike Schuler

Image
The future USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000) departing Bath Iron Works in Bath, Maine, marking the beginning of a 3-month journey to its new homeport in San Diego. U.S. Navy Photo

The future USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000), the largest and most technologically advanced destroyer ever built for the U.S. Navy, has departed Bath Iron Works shipyard where it has been under construction for more than half a decade.

At a total of cost of nearly $4 billion, the DDG 1000 is also the most expensive destroyer ever built for the U.S. Navy.

The DDG 1000 is the lead ship of the new Zumwalt-class, the U.S. Navy’s next-generation, guided-missile naval destroyer. The Zumwalt-class features a state-of-the-art electric propulsion system, a wave-piercing tumblehome hull, a stealthy low radar profile design, and the latest war fighting technology and weaponry available.

Image
The future guided-missile destroyer USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000) transits the Atlantic Ocean during acceptance trials April 21, 2016. U.S. Navy Photo

DDG 1000 will be the first U.S. Navy combatant surface ship to be equipped with an integrated power system (IPS) to provide electric power for propulsion and ship services. The IPS generates approximately 78 megawatts of power, nearly equal to a nuclear-powered aircraft carrier, in order to meet the total ship electric power requirements and provide extra capacity to accommodate future weapons and systems.

“With 78 megawatts of power generation capacity readily available, DDG 1000 enters the Fleet bringing with it a new era of power generation, conversion and propulsion to the U.S. Navy,” said Capt. James A. Kirk, Zumwalt’s commanding officer.

In addition to its advanced weapon and propulsion systems, Zumwalt is also much larger than today’s destroyers, weighing some 15,000 tonnes. At 610 feet long and 80.7 feet wide, Zumwalt is 100 feet longer and 13 feet wider and its flight deck is 93 percent larger than an Arleigh Burke-class destroyer to which it succeeds.

But despite its size, Zumwalt is crewed by just 147 sailors, about half that of the Arleigh Burke-class.

“Stealthy, powerful and lethal, Zumwalt integration into the fleet will provide a vital link from the Navy’s current needs to its future capabilities,” the U.S. Navy said in a statement Monday.

The USS Zumwalt is to be formally commissioned during Fleet Week Maryland in Baltimore on October 15, at which point it will then begin its transit to San Diego.

Upon arrival in San Diego, the destroyer is scheduled to take part in a Post Delivery Availability and Mission Systems Activation and is expected to be integrated into the fleet in 2018 following test and evaluation.

Image
The Zumwalt-class guided-missile destroyer DDG 1000 is floated out of dry dock at the General Dynamics Bath Iron Works shipyard on October 28, 2013. U.S. Navy Photo

DDG 1000 is named for Adm. Elmo R. “Bud” Zumwalt Jr., former chief of naval operations (CNO) from 1970 to 1974. A veteran of World War II and the conflicts in Korea and Vietnam, Adm. Zumwalt served 32 years of dedicated naval service, earning a Bronze Star with Valor for his actions during the Battle of Leyte Gulf.

“We take a great deal of pride in our namesake, Adm. Zumwalt, and are committed to honoring him through our service,” said Kirk.

Bath Iron Works, part of General Dynamics, has been commissioned to build three Zumwalt-class destroyers for the U.S. Navy, Zumwalt (DDG 1000), Michael Monsoor (DDG 1001) and Lyndon Johnson (DDG 1002).


I read somewhere a while back that the Zumwalt's stealth will allow it to give off a radar signature that of a small fishing trawler.
Image
Don't tread on me
User avatar
Buc2
 
Posts: 7554
Joined: Wed Jan 14, 2015 2:16 pm
Location: America
Has thanked: 715 times
Been thanked: 255 times

Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby bucfanclw » Fri Sep 09, 2016 2:12 pm

I liked the tech they had behind the littoral class but it sucks they've been so bad in practice. Hopefully the new propulsion system on this class has been properly tested before they are put in real service.
User avatar
bucfanclw
 
Posts: 2993
Joined: Wed Jan 14, 2015 4:09 pm
Location: I'm told Clewiston
Has thanked: 16 times
Been thanked: 133 times

Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby Buc2 » Fri Sep 09, 2016 2:30 pm

bucfanclw wrote:I liked the tech they had behind the littoral class but it sucks they've been so bad in practice. Hopefully the new propulsion system on this class has been properly tested before they are put in real service.

I would say they've already been tested during sea trials. The sea trials would have happened before transferring to their permanent base in San Diego.
Image
Don't tread on me
User avatar
Buc2
 
Posts: 7554
Joined: Wed Jan 14, 2015 2:16 pm
Location: America
Has thanked: 715 times
Been thanked: 255 times

Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby bucfanclw » Fri Sep 09, 2016 3:25 pm

Buc2 wrote:
bucfanclw wrote:I liked the tech they had behind the littoral class but it sucks they've been so bad in practice. Hopefully the new propulsion system on this class has been properly tested before they are put in real service.

I would say they've already been tested during sea trials. The sea trials would have happened before transferring to their permanent base in San Diego.

There's 3 LCS ships already in San Diego as well... they've been breaking down over the past year. I'm just hoping the new propulsion system fares better since it's only a few months removed from initial testing.
User avatar
bucfanclw
 
Posts: 2993
Joined: Wed Jan 14, 2015 4:09 pm
Location: I'm told Clewiston
Has thanked: 16 times
Been thanked: 133 times

Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby Buc2 » Sat Sep 10, 2016 9:49 am

bucfanclw wrote:
Buc2 wrote:I would say they've already been tested during sea trials. The sea trials would have happened before transferring to their permanent base in San Diego.

There's 3 LCS ships already in San Diego as well... they've been breaking down over the past year. I'm just hoping the new propulsion system fares better since it's only a few months removed from initial testing.

I see what you're saying. Good point. It would suck if this boat turns out to be nothing but a big waste of money.
Image
Don't tread on me
User avatar
Buc2
 
Posts: 7554
Joined: Wed Jan 14, 2015 2:16 pm
Location: America
Has thanked: 715 times
Been thanked: 255 times

Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby Buc2 » Thu Sep 22, 2016 8:08 am

Is there LIFE on Europa? NASA to announce major news in breakthrough press conference
NASA has called a press conference on Monday when the space agency will announce a breakthrough on Jupiter's moon Europa.
By SEAN MARTIN
PUBLISHED: 05:59, Thu, Sep 22, 2016 | UPDATED: 13:21, Thu, Sep 22, 2016

The US group sent out a cryptic message, stating that there is “surprising activity” on Europa – the most well known of Jupiter’s 67 moons.

NASA has been analysing data from its Hubble Space Telescope which is currently prowling the universe.

The space experts said in a statement announcing the event on Monday, to be broadcast live at 7PM UK time: “Astronomers will present results from a unique Europa observing campaign that resulted in surprising evidence of activity that may be related to the presence of a subsurface ocean on Europa.”

Most scientists agree that where there is water, it massively increases the chances of finding life.

Europa has long been touted as a possible host of life elsewhere in the Solar System, and even boffins working on the Juno Probe, which is currently in orbit around Jupiter, believe that it could be a likely habitable zone for some lifeforms.

More...
Image
Don't tread on me
User avatar
Buc2
 
Posts: 7554
Joined: Wed Jan 14, 2015 2:16 pm
Location: America
Has thanked: 715 times
Been thanked: 255 times

PreviousNext

post

Return to Off Topic

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 12 guests