The Science & Technology Thread

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Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby bucfanclw » Tue Jun 27, 2017 10:15 am

deltbucs wrote:Woke up at 2:15 AM last night (8:30 Geneva time) so I could get my tour of Cern booked. You can only book 15 days in advance and they fill up quick. It's been on my bucket list for years and I'll be there in just 2 weeks!

That's pretty awesome. I'd love to see that.
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Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby deltbucs » Tue Jun 27, 2017 10:16 am

bucfanclw wrote:
deltbucs wrote:Woke up at 2:15 AM last night (8:30 Geneva time) so I could get my tour of Cern booked. You can only book 15 days in advance and they fill up quick. It's been on my bucket list for years and I'll be there in just 2 weeks!

That's pretty awesome. I'd love to see that.

Yeah...unfortunately, you don't get to go underground and see the LHC, but I'm still stoked
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Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby Rocker » Tue Jun 27, 2017 11:30 am

deltbucs wrote:Woke up at 2:15 AM last night (8:30 Geneva time) so I could get my tour of Cern booked. You can only book 15 days in advance and they fill up quick. It's been on my bucket list for years and I'll be there in just 2 weeks!


That's pretty ****ing cool.
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Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby Buc2 » Tue Jun 27, 2017 12:33 pm

deltbucs wrote:Woke up at 2:15 AM last night (8:30 Geneva time) so I could get my tour of Cern booked. You can only book 15 days in advance and they fill up quick. It's been on my bucket list for years and I'll be there in just 2 weeks!

Lucky! Please report back on your visit.
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Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby deltbucs » Tue Jun 27, 2017 1:02 pm

Buc2 wrote:
deltbucs wrote:Woke up at 2:15 AM last night (8:30 Geneva time) so I could get my tour of Cern booked. You can only book 15 days in advance and they fill up quick. It's been on my bucket list for years and I'll be there in just 2 weeks!

Lucky! Please report back on your visit.

Will do. I'll get some pictures for sure.
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Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby Buc2 » Sun Jul 02, 2017 3:48 pm

SpaceX's next launch set for 7:36 PM EDT tonight from Kennedy’s LC-39A.
You can watch it live here:


Scheduled for Jul 2, 2017
SpaceX is targeting launch of Intelsat 35e from Launch Complex 39A (LC-39A) at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The 58-minute launch window opens on Sunday, July 2, at 7:36 p.m. EDT, or 23:36 UTC. The satellite will be deployed approximately 32 minutes after launch.

A backup launch window opens on Monday, July 3, at 7:37 p.m. EDT, or 23:37 UTC. SpaceX will not attempt to land Falcon 9’s first stage after launch due to mission requirements.
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Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby Corsair » Tue Jul 04, 2017 3:19 pm

Arctic Climate Change Study Canceled Due to Climate Change
Jessica Wapner
06.15.17 8:00 AM

The Canadian research icebreaker CCGS Amundsen, an Arctic expedition vessel, will not be venturing north for its planned trip this year. The highly anticipated voyage aimed to monitor and understand the effects of climate change on Arctic marine and coastal ecosystems. But due to warming temperatures, Arctic sea ice is unexpectedly in motion, making the trip far too dangerous for the Amundsen and the scientists it would be carrying. In other words, the climate change study has been rendered unsafe by climate change.

The project, known as the Hudson Bay System Study (BaySys), involves 40 scientists from five Canadian universities and was supported by $15 million over four years. A partnership between the scientists, led by the University of Manitoba, and the Canadian Coast Guard has been facilitating such climate change studies for nearly 15 years. The Amundsen is equipped with 65 scientific systems, 22 onboard and portable laboratories and a plethora of instruments that have been allowing researchers to study sediment, ocean ecosystems from just below the ice to just above the seafloor, the ice, the snow and the atmosphere.

The planned 2017 expedition was scheduled to depart six days early due to severe ice conditions in the Strait of Bell Isle, along the northeast coast of Newfoundland. The team was to carry out crucial operations in that area before starting their scientific program.

But the researchers, led by David Barber, expedition chief scientist and BaySys scientific lead, soon realized the trip was impossible. A southward motion of hazardous Arctic sea ice would prevent the Amundsen from reaching its destination in time to conduct the planned studies.

Barber said the severe ice conditions in the area are the result of climate change. Warming temperatures have reduced both the extent and thickness of the ice and increased its mobility. “Ice conditions are likely to become more variable, and severe conditions such as these will occur more often,” Barber said in a statement.

“Considering the severe ice conditions and the increasing demand for search-and-rescue operations and ice escort, we decided to cancel the BaySys mission,” said Barber.

Other portions of the 2017 Amundsen expedition will continue. Specifically, a planned oceanographic study and a Nunavik Inuit Health Survey are on schedule. The team also hopes to resume the BaySys program in 2018.

“The research of our scientists clearly indicate that climate change is not something that is going to happen in the future—it is already here,” a University of Manitoba statement announcing the cancelation stated.
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Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby Nano » Tue Jul 04, 2017 4:48 pm

Sounds like something from r/nottheonion
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Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby Buc2 » Wed Jul 05, 2017 2:35 pm

Buc2 wrote:SpaceX's next launch set for 7:36 PM EDT tonight from Kennedy’s LC-39A.
You can watch it live here:


Scheduled for Jul 2, 2017
SpaceX is targeting launch of Intelsat 35e from Launch Complex 39A (LC-39A) at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The 58-minute launch window opens on Sunday, July 2, at 7:36 p.m. EDT, or 23:36 UTC. The satellite will be deployed approximately 32 minutes after launch.

A backup launch window opens on Monday, July 3, at 7:37 p.m. EDT, or 23:37 UTC. SpaceX will not attempt to land Falcon 9’s first stage after launch due to mission requirements.


In case you missed it, don't worry. It never happened. They will try again tonight. Same SpaceX time. Same SpaceX channel.

SpaceX to try again for rocket launch tonight

After two last-minute launch scrubs earlier this week, SpaceX will try for a third time to launch a satellite aboard its Falcon 9 rocket from Kennedy Space Center.

Luxembourg-based company Intelsat, which owns the satellite payload being put into space, tweeted that SpaceX had completed a review of both Sunday and Monday’s aborted attempts and is go for launch again tonight. The 58-minute launch window opens at 7:37 p.m.

SpaceX founder Elon Musk said the company spent July 4 reviewing rocket & pad systems to make sure the new attempt from launch pad 39A goes off successfully.

SpaceX is set to launch a Falcon 9 rocket from Kennedy Space Center, but has had to scrub it on two attempts. A third attempt could come on July 4, 2017, carrying a satellite into orbit for Luxembourg-based company Intelsat.
The Intelsat satellite was built by Boeing and is part of Intelsat’s “next generation” constellation of satellites, the fourth sent up by the company. The new satellites are geared to offer higher quality Internet service and mobile communications.

Both previous attempts to launch the rocket were scrubbed just 10 seconds before planned liftoff by automated computer systems.

Sunday’s scrub was due to a computer guidance problem. The reason for Monday’s scrub has yet to be revealed by SpaceX.

If there is a successful launch, there will be no attempt to recover the first stage rocket booster, which has been a hallmark of many SpaceX launches from Cape Canaveral. The satellite payload has to be placed into a higher orbit, meaning more rocket fuel will be used, and no chance for recovery.

If it launches, it will be the third rocket launch for the Hawthorne, California-based company in two weeks. The company launched a Bulgarian satellite from Kennedy Space Center on June 23 as well as 10 satellites on June 25 from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California.

While it wasn’t able to put a rocket into space on Monday, SpaceX did welcome home the Dragon cargo capsule from the International Space Station. The splashdown in the Pacific Ocean marked the completion of the first reused commercial spacecraft to be sent to and returned home from the space station.

The Dragon capsule launched from Kennedy Space Center on June 3 and undocked from the ISS on July 2. The same capsule made its first trip to the ISS three years earlier. The reuse of the capsule and reuse of the rocket boosters by the company are part of its efforts to drive down launch costs.

SpaceX's cargo capsule is the only supply ship able to survive re-entry into Earth's atmosphere.

The planned launch, when it happens, will be the 11th from Cape Canaveral from all companies in 2017 and the 102nd mission to launch from that historic complex that was home to Apollo and space shuttle missions.
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Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby Buc2 » Fri Jul 07, 2017 11:59 am

The hope of finding life on Mars has just been dealt a major blow.

LIFE ON MARS? STUDY SHOWING MARTIAN SOIL KILLS BACTERIA DIMS HOPES
BY JESSICA WAPNER ON 7/7/17 AT 11:01 AM

Recent images and other compelling evidence that water once flowed on Mars have generated hope of finding microbial life there. That hope has been dealt a blow by a new study showing the soil surface is toxic to bacteria.

Astrobiologists—researchers who search for microbial life elsewhere in the universe—have known for some time that the surface of Mars contains perchlorates, or salt minerals. The compounds are stable at room temperature but become activated at high heat. On Earth, perchlorate is used to produce rocket fuel and fireworks. The Atacama desert, in Chile, contains naturally occurring perchlorate, which has been mined for use in nitrate-based fertilizers.

Perchlorate was initially discovered in the Martian soil in 2008, from samples collected by the Phoenix Mars Lander and analyzed on board the craft. The chemical can lower the freezing point of water substantially. At the time, researchers concluded that perchlorate could remain stable in the Martian soil in liquid form for several hours each summer day.

But the new study, conducted by Jennifer Wadsworth and Charles Cockell, both astrobiologists at the University of Edinburgh, found that perchlorate can also be activated by ultraviolet (UV) light, without heat. Those conditions reflect the Martian surface. And bacteria exposed to UV-activated perchlorate were killed within minutes.

In their study, published in Nature Scientific Reports, the researchers irradiated a bacteria called Bacillus subtilis in the presence of perchlorate at concentrations found on the Martian surface. The amount of UV light mimicked what Mars is subjected to.

After 30 seconds, "cell viability was completely lost," the authors write. Cells exposed to perchlorate but not UV radiation remained viable for up to an hour. The researchers repeated the experiment under several Mars-analagous conditions, such as a rocky environment, and found the same results: Bacteria exposed to perchlorate and UV radiation were killed almost instantly.

The effect was milder when perchlorate concentrations were reduced, indicating that conditions with lower amounts of the compound may not wipe out bacteria so completely. But any region of Mars environment that concentrates perchlorates, the researchers write, "will produce uninhabitable environments." The evidence of water may not be reason to hope for finding life on Mars. "The mere presence of liquid water seeps, thought to be good locations to search for life, does not imply environments fit for life," the study notes.

That leaves the search for life narrowed to deep below the Martian surface. "If we want to find life on Mars, we have to take this into consideration and look at trying to find subsurface life that wouldn't be exposed to these conditions," Wadsworth told AFP. And that search is going to require a very strong drill. In the meantime, everyone packing their bags may want to rethink their plans.
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Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby beardmcdoug » Fri Jul 07, 2017 12:36 pm

Buc2 wrote:The hope of finding life on Mars has just been dealt a major blow.

LIFE ON MARS? STUDY SHOWING MARTIAN SOIL KILLS BACTERIA DIMS HOPES
BY JESSICA WAPNER ON 7/7/17 AT 11:01 AM

Recent images and other compelling evidence that water once flowed on Mars have generated hope of finding microbial life there. That hope has been dealt a blow by a new study showing the soil surface is toxic to one type of* bacteria.

Astrobiologists—researchers who search for microbial life elsewhere in the universe—have known for some time that the surface of Mars contains perchlorates, or salt minerals. The compounds are stable at room temperature but become activated at high heat. On Earth, perchlorate is used to produce rocket fuel and fireworks. The Atacama desert, in Chile, contains naturally occurring perchlorate, which has been mined for use in nitrate-based fertilizers.

Perchlorate was initially discovered in the Martian soil in 2008, from samples collected by the Phoenix Mars Lander and analyzed on board the craft. The chemical can lower the freezing point of water substantially. At the time, researchers concluded that perchlorate could remain stable in the Martian soil in liquid form for several hours each summer day.

But the new study, conducted by Jennifer Wadsworth and Charles Cockell, both astrobiologists at the University of Edinburgh, found that perchlorate can also be activated by ultraviolet (UV) light, without heat. Those conditions reflect the Martian surface. And bacteria exposed to UV-activated perchlorate were killed within minutes.

In their study, published in Nature Scientific Reports, the researchers irradiated a single type of* bacteria called Bacillus subtilis, which is one of an estimated 120,000-150,000 species of bacteria currently living on earth*, in the presence of perchlorate at concentrations found on the Martian surface. The amount of UV light mimicked what Mars is subjected to.

After 30 seconds, "cell viability was completely lost," the authors write. Cells exposed to perchlorate but not UV radiation remained viable for up to an hour. The researchers repeated the experiment under several Mars-analagous conditions, such as a rocky environment, and found the same results: This one type of* Bacteria, which is one of 120,000-150,000 present on earth*, when exposed to perchlorate and UV radiation were killed almost instantly.

The effect was milder when perchlorate concentrations were reduced, indicating that conditions with lower amounts of the compound may not wipe out this type of* bacteria so completely; the viability and response to such exposure of the other 119,999 - 149,999 types of bacteria is unknown, however*. But any region of Mars environment that concentrates perchlorates, the researchers write, "will produce uninhabitable environments." The evidence of water may not be reason to hope for finding life on Mars. "The mere presence of liquid water seeps, thought to be good locations to search for life, does not imply environments fit for life," the study notes.

That leaves the search for life narrowed to deep below the Martian surface. "If we want to find life on Mars, we have to take this into consideration and look at trying to find subsurface life that wouldn't be exposed to these conditions," Wadsworth told AFP. And that search is going to require a very strong drill. In the meantime, everyone packing their bags may want to rethink their plans.


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Here, let me correct that for you, Jessica

"Dims hopes", "Dealt a major blow", "narrows search", "not be reason to hope", "...everyone packing their bags may want to rethink their plans"

Clickbait. Disingenuous garbage. Next.

Newsweek too, nonetheless. This is the type of subtly-disingenuous bullshit has been increasing over the past several years and its flat out obvious these days. Its a ****ing slant. Every. Time. And because I'm not a god damn mouth breather, I'm forced to ****ing think about the motivations of such an article, rather than the substance. Which is a normal ****ing reaction because when it becomes apparent that somebody is trying to bullshit you, you tend to want to know why and how. And its annoying as ****. Does this not bother the **** out of anybody else?
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Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby Nano » Fri Jul 07, 2017 12:43 pm

http://www.smh.com.au/federal-politics/political-news/south-australia-to-announce-tesla-as-backer-of-worlds-largest-battery-20170707-gx6mhy.html

Elon Musk is helping fund...a battery

(My tablet won't let me copy/paste that website for some reason)
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Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby Buc2 » Fri Jul 07, 2017 12:52 pm

beardmcdoug wrote:
Buc2 wrote:The hope of finding life on Mars has just been dealt a major blow.



Image

Here, let me correct that for you, Jessica

"Dims hopes", "Dealt a major blow", "narrows search", "not be reason to hope", "...everyone packing their bags may want to rethink their plans"

Clickbait. Disingenuous garbage. Next.

Newsweek too, nonetheless. This is the type of subtly-disingenuous bullshit has been increasing over the past several years and its flat out obvious these days. Its a ****ing slant. Every. Time. And because I'm not a god damn mouth breather, I'm forced to ****ing think about the motivations of such an article, rather than the substance. Which is a normal ****ing reaction because when it becomes apparent that somebody is trying to bullshit you, you tend to want to know why and how. And its annoying as ****. Does this not bother the **** out of anybody else?


I'm sorry. I guess I should have posted the story that has the caveat in it.

Here you go: https://www.scientificamerican.com/arti ... tian-soil/

There's an important caveat to the new results, however: B. subtilis is a garden-variety microbe, not an "extremophile" adapted to survive in harsh conditions, the researchers said.
"It's not out of the question that hardier life forms would find a way to survive" at or near the Martian surface, Wadsworth told Space.com. "It's important we still take all the precautions we can to not contaminate Mars."
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Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby beardmcdoug » Fri Jul 07, 2017 1:20 pm

Buc2 wrote:
beardmcdoug wrote:
Image

Here, let me correct that for you, Jessica

"Dims hopes", "Dealt a major blow", "narrows search", "not be reason to hope", "...everyone packing their bags may want to rethink their plans"

Clickbait. Disingenuous garbage. Next.

Newsweek too, nonetheless. This is the type of subtly-disingenuous bullshit has been increasing over the past several years and its flat out obvious these days. Its a ****ing slant. Every. Time. And because I'm not a god damn mouth breather, I'm forced to ****ing think about the motivations of such an article, rather than the substance. Which is a normal ****ing reaction because when it becomes apparent that somebody is trying to bullshit you, you tend to want to know why and how. And its annoying as ****. Does this not bother the **** out of anybody else?


I'm sorry. I guess I should have posted the story that doesn't have any of those numbers in it.

Here you go: https://www.scientificamerican.com/arti ... tian-soil/


No, I added those numbers to the article you linked to provide perspective about the research, to illustrate how narrow its scope is, and to highlight how disingenuous Jessica is being with her clickbait article and headline

The article you just posted, from scientificamerican.com was actually incredibly well-written and had a high degree of fidelity to the true nature of the findings, particularly when they added this as the finisher:

There's an important caveat to the new results, however: B. subtilis is a garden-variety microbe, not an "extremophile" adapted to survive in harsh conditions, the researchers said.
"It's not out of the question that hardier life forms would find a way to survive" at or near the Martian surface, Wadsworth told Space.com. "It's important we still take all the precautions we can to not contaminate Mars."


which was my exact freaking point. the bacteria they tested weren't even the most robust type, so the whole freaking newsweek article is just plain clickbait garbage. this is an incredibly small issue, and I'm not trying to make a mountain out of a mole hill, but this is a "death by a thousand cuts" type of thing and it just bothers the heck out of me


Edit: I see you fixed what you said while I was responding. yes, that's a big caveat. there's nuance involved here but it matters. because the two stories are vastly different and their conclusions will take root in peoples' minds. 2 times the people will read that newsweek version as opposed to that scientificamerican version (according to internet statistics about each site)
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Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby Buc2 » Fri Jul 07, 2017 1:45 pm

beardmcdoug wrote:
Buc2 wrote:
I'm sorry. I guess I should have posted the story that doesn't have any of those numbers in it.

Here you go: https://www.scientificamerican.com/arti ... tian-soil/


No, I added those numbers to the article you linked to provide perspective about the research, to illustrate how narrow its scope is, and to highlight how disingenuous Jessica is being with her clickbait article and headline

The article you just posted, from scientificamerican.com was actually incredibly well-written and had a high degree of fidelity to the true nature of the findings, particularly when they added this as the finisher:

There's an important caveat to the new results, however: B. subtilis is a garden-variety microbe, not an "extremophile" adapted to survive in harsh conditions, the researchers said.
"It's not out of the question that hardier life forms would find a way to survive" at or near the Martian surface, Wadsworth told Space.com. "It's important we still take all the precautions we can to not contaminate Mars."


which was my exact freaking point. the bacteria they tested weren't even the most robust type, so the whole freaking newsweek article is just plain clickbait garbage. this is an incredibly small issue, and I'm not trying to make a mountain out of a mole hill, but this is a "death by a thousand cuts" type of thing and it just bothers the heck out of me


Edit: I see you fixed what you said while I was responding. yes, that's a big caveat. there's nuance involved here but it matters. because the two stories are vastly different and their conclusions will take root in peoples' minds. 2 times the people will read that newsweek version as opposed to that scientificamerican version (according to internet statistics about each site)

Yeah. I was like, wait a minute! I didn't recall reading those numbers. :lol: Anyway, after I got the meaning behind your post, I went back to see other articles that I noticed had been written. When I saw the SA one, I read it and wished I'd posted it instead. But, yeah. You make a good point. And that's a major problem with today's media. And it's easy to read that stuff and not think about it in the proper context.
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Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby beardmcdoug » Fri Jul 07, 2017 2:14 pm

Buc2 wrote:
beardmcdoug wrote:
No, I added those numbers to the article you linked to provide perspective about the research, to illustrate how narrow its scope is, and to highlight how disingenuous Jessica is being with her clickbait article and headline

The article you just posted, from scientificamerican.com was actually incredibly well-written and had a high degree of fidelity to the true nature of the findings, particularly when they added this as the finisher:



which was my exact freaking point. the bacteria they tested weren't even the most robust type, so the whole freaking newsweek article is just plain clickbait garbage. this is an incredibly small issue, and I'm not trying to make a mountain out of a mole hill, but this is a "death by a thousand cuts" type of thing and it just bothers the heck out of me


Edit: I see you fixed what you said while I was responding. yes, that's a big caveat. there's nuance involved here but it matters. because the two stories are vastly different and their conclusions will take root in peoples' minds. 2 times the people will read that newsweek version as opposed to that scientificamerican version (according to internet statistics about each site)

Yeah. I was like, wait a minute! I didn't recall reading those numbers. :lol: Anyway, after I got the meaning behind your post, I went back to see other articles that I noticed had been written. When I saw the SA one, I read it and wished I'd posted it instead. But, yeah. You make a good point. And that's a major problem with today's media. And it's easy to read that stuff and not think about it in the proper context.


hah! right on, brother
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Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby Zarniwoop » Fri Jul 07, 2017 2:18 pm

I'm just enjoying the discussion of "click bait" as it pertains to microbial life on Mars.

I never thought I'd hear those 2 go together
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Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby Buc2 » Fri Jul 07, 2017 2:25 pm

Zarniwoop wrote:I'm just enjoying the discussion of "click bait" as it pertains to microbial life on Mars.

I never thought I'd hear those 2 go together

That is odd, isn't it? heh
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Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby Buc2 » Sun Jul 09, 2017 12:35 pm

beardmcdoug wrote:
Buc2 wrote:Yeah. I was like, wait a minute! I didn't recall reading those numbers. :lol: Anyway, after I got the meaning behind your post, I went back to see other articles that I noticed had been written. When I saw the SA one, I read it and wished I'd posted it instead. But, yeah. You make a good point. And that's a major problem with today's media. And it's easy to read that stuff and not think about it in the proper context.


hah! right on, brother

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Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby Buc2 » Mon Jul 10, 2017 12:13 pm

Can't wait to see the release of the photos from tonight's flyover. Should be awesome.

Humans have observed the Great Red Spot on Jupiter for at least 150 years, possibly even longer. Stargazers saw a spot through telescopes as early as the 17th century, but scientists can’t say for sure if it’s the same one. Regardless, NASA’s Juno spacecraft will get the closest view ever captured of the planet’s famous feature during a flyby on Monday.

"Jupiter's mysterious Great Red Spot is probably the best-known feature of Jupiter," Scott Bolton, Juno’s principal investigator, said in a statement. "This monumental storm has raged on the solar system's biggest planet for centuries. Now, Juno and her cloud-penetrating science instruments will dive in to see how deep the roots of this storm go, and help us understand how this giant storm works and what makes it so special."

Juno launched from Cape Canaveral in Florida on August 5, 2011, and traveled more than 1.7 billion miles through interplanetary solar winds before safely entering the orbit of our solar system’s largest planet just over a year ago. NASA has previously explored Jupiter with flybys (Pioneers 10 and 11 and Voyagers 1 and 2) and the Galileo orbiter, but Juno is the first space mission ever to enter a polar orbit around the planet. The spacecraft has been flying in 53-day orbits around Jupiter.

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On Monday at 9:55 p.m. ET, Juno will get as close as 2,200 miles above the cloud tops when it reaches the point in its orbit nearest Jupiter’s center. During the next 11 minutes and 33 seconds, it will travel another 24,713 miles and pass over the Great Red Spot at a height of about 5,600 miles. Scientists have never had the chance to study it at a closer range. All of Juno’s instruments, including the JunoCam, will be on for the rare opportunity to collect more information about a spot that has piqued humans’ curiosity for centuries.

NASA has called Jupiter’s Great Red Spot “a swirling mystery” as recently as 2015, when the spacecraft was still en route toward the planet. The storm’s winds reach speeds of up to 400 miles per hour, compared to the roughly 200 miles per hour of the largest, strongest hurricanes on Earth. Scientists still don’t know enough about the storm or what gives it the reddish color, even though several have conducted lab experiments that simulate Jupiter’s atmosphere to try to pinpoint an explanation. Amy Simon, an expert in planetary atmospheres at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, explained that Jupiter and its iconic Great Red Spot could help scientists gain a better understanding of Earth’s weather system, as well as those of worlds beyond our solar system.

“The Great Red Spot is basically the largest storm in the entire solar system,” Bolton tells Newsweek. “It's bigger than the Earth. It was even bigger decades ago. It’s very puzzling.” Even though the storm has lasted so long and is so big, he explains, scientists don’t know where the energy and power of the storm are coming from, or even what it looks like in great detail. Monday’s flyby will likely help garner some new information that could help explain the phenomenon—such as making use, for example, of the microwave radiometer that can look through the clouds to the atmosphere below. Bolton says this will be one of multiple passes over the Great Red Spot, though it’s unclear exactly when the next opportunity will arise.

The images Juno captures on Monday are bound to be stunning. Bolton can’t say with certainty when the first will be released, as the spacecraft has to get farther from Jupiter and turn back toward Earth before data can be downlinked, but he predicts they’ll be published by the weekend. They should be worth the wait.

“The images Juno has been able to return—Jupiter's like a piece of art,” he says. “I expect that this Great Red Spot might be a piece of art.”


Click here for more from nasa.org
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Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby Buc2 » Mon Jul 10, 2017 1:13 pm

So who plans to view the solar eclipse August 21st? It will be a total eclipse for a swath of the U.S. starting in Oregon and ending in South Carolina.

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You can find out what the eclipse should look like from your area here: https://www.timeanddate.com/eclipse/in.html

Here's what my view should look like:
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More detailed eclipse maps
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Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby DreadNaught » Mon Jul 10, 2017 1:20 pm

I will be listening to Bonnie Tyler while watching this total eclipse.
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Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby Buc2 » Mon Jul 10, 2017 1:22 pm

DreadNaught wrote:I will be listening to Bonnie Tyler while watching this total eclipse.

Where will you see it from if I may ask?
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Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby Noles1724 » Mon Jul 10, 2017 2:38 pm

I have some buddies that live in Charleston, SC and they're going to AnB their place. From what they hear people are coming from all over the world to their neck of the woods for the event.
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Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby Buc2 » Mon Jul 10, 2017 3:04 pm

Noles1724 wrote:I have some buddies that live in Charleston, SC and they're going to AnB their place. From what they hear people are coming from all over the world to their neck of the woods for the event.

I'm not surprised. As far as the U.S. goes, this will be the first total solar eclipse to cross the entire country in 99 years. Lots of good sized cities are in the path of totality. Salem, OR; Casper, WY; Lincoln, NE; Kansas City, MO; Nashville, TN; Greenville/Columbia/Charleston, SC...
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Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby PanteraCanes » Mon Jul 10, 2017 3:35 pm

Buc2 wrote:
DreadNaught wrote:I will be listening to Bonnie Tyler while watching this total eclipse.

Where will you see it from if I may ask?


He isn't sure, he just knows he will keep turning around.
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Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby Buc2 » Mon Jul 10, 2017 3:52 pm

:lol:
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Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby paco74 » Tue Jul 11, 2017 8:44 am

Buc2 wrote:So who plans to view the solar eclipse August 21st? It will be a total eclipse for a swath of the U.S. starting in Oregon and ending in South Carolina.

Image

You can find out what the eclipse should look like from your area here: https://www.timeanddate.com/eclipse/in.html

Here's what my view should look like:
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More detailed eclipse maps

Thank goodness! For once, living in the Dallas area will pay dividends!!\


BUT, I may drive up to Oklahoma City for a better percentage.
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Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby Mountaineer Buc » Tue Jul 11, 2017 9:49 am

Love that this is going to hit in the middle of the day for me in the panhandle.

Says I'll get 83% obstruction by 1:30 that afternoon.
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Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby Buc2 » Wed Jul 12, 2017 11:52 am

Is a quantum internet is another step closer to reality?

First Object Teleported from Earth to Orbit
Researchers in China have teleported a photon from the ground to a satellite orbiting more than 500 kilometers above.

by Emerging Technology from the arXiv July 10, 2017

Last year, a Long March 2D rocket took off from the Jiuquan Satellite Launch Centre in the Gobi Desert carrying a satellite called Micius, named after an ancient Chinese philosopher who died in 391 B.C. The rocket placed Micius in a Sun-synchronous orbit so that it passes over the same point on Earth at the same time each day.

Micius is a highly sensitive photon receiver that can detect the quantum states of single photons fired from the ground. That’s important because it should allow scientists to test the technological building blocks for various quantum feats such as entanglement, cryptography, and teleportation.

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Today, the Micius team announced the results of its first experiments. The team created the first satellite-to-ground quantum network, in the process smashing the record for the longest distance over which entanglement has been measured. And they’ve used this quantum network to teleport the first object from the ground to orbit.

Teleportation has become a standard operation in quantum optics labs around the world. The technique relies on the strange phenomenon of entanglement. This occurs when two quantum objects, such as photons, form at the same instant and point in space and so share the same existence. In technical terms, they are described by the same wave function.

The curious thing about entanglement is that this shared existence continues even when the photons are separated by vast distances. So a measurement on one immediately influences the state of the other, regardless of the distance between them.

Back in the 1990s, scientists realized they could use this link to transmit quantum information from one point in the universe to another. The idea is to “download” all the information associated with one photon in one place and transmit it over an entangled link to another photon in another place.

This second photon then takes on the identity of the first. To all intents and purposes, it becomes the first photon. That’s the nature of teleportation and it has been performed many times in labs on Earth.

Teleportation is a building block for a wide range of technologies. “Long-distance teleportation has been recognized as a fundamental element in protocols such as large-scale quantum networks and distributed quantum computation,” says the Chinese team.

In theory, there should be no maximum distance over which this can be done. But entanglement is a fragile thing because photons interact with matter in the atmosphere or inside optical fibers, causing the entanglement to be lost.

As a result, the distance over which scientists have measured entanglement or performed teleportation is severely limited. “Previous teleportation experiments between distant locations were limited to a distance on the order of 100 kilometers, due to photon loss in optical fibers or terrestrial free-space channels,” says the team.

But Micius changes all that because it orbits at an altitude of 500 kilometers, and for most of this distance, any photons making the journey travel through a vacuum. To minimize the amount of atmosphere in the way, the Chinese team set up its ground station in Ngari in Tibet at an altitude of over 4,000 meters. So the distance from the ground to the satellite varies from 1,400 kilometers when it is near the horizon to 500 kilometers when it is overhead.

To perform the experiment, the Chinese team created entangled pairs of photons on the ground at a rate of about 4,000 per second. They then beamed one of these photons to the satellite, which passed overhead every day at midnight. They kept the other photon on the ground.

Finally, they measured the photons on the ground and in orbit to confirm that entanglement was taking place, and that they were able to teleport photons in this way. Over 32 days, they sent millions of photons and found positive results in 911 cases. “We report the first quantum teleportation of independent single-photon qubits from a ground observatory to a low Earth orbit satellite—through an up-link channel— with a distance up to 1400 km,” says the Chinese team.

This is the first time that any object has been teleported from Earth to orbit, and it smashes the record for the longest distance for entanglement.

That’s impressive work that sets the stage for much more ambitious goals in the future. “This work establishes the first ground-to-satellite up-link for faithful and ultra-long-distance quantum teleportation, an essential step toward global-scale quantum internet,” says the team.

It also shows China’s obvious dominance and lead in a field that, until recently, was led by Europe and the U.S.—Micius would surely have been impressed. But an important question now is how the West will respond.
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