The Science & Technology Thread

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Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby Kress » Thu Feb 23, 2017 8:22 am

Mountaineer Buc wrote:
Step it up to warp 8 and you can get there in 27.8 days.



****, I think that it took me that long to get to New Zealand. That's a bargain.
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Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby Buc2 » Thu Feb 23, 2017 8:32 am

Mountaineer Buc wrote:
Buc2 wrote:Pfft! At warp factor 6, this system is only a mere 65 days away.

Somebody used a warp speed calculator.

Step it up to warp 8 and you can get there in 27.8 days. But you are going to need one of the better starships. Preferably a constitution class.

Yes I did. Being realistic, however, if we can ever reach 1/2 light speed, we could make to that system within a generation. Their kids/grandkids would be the colonists.
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Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby Mountaineer Buc » Thu Feb 23, 2017 9:22 am

Kress wrote:
Mountaineer Buc wrote:
Step it up to warp 8 and you can get there in 27.8 days.



****, I think that it took me that long to get to New Zealand. That's a bargain.

What did you do, travel by kayak?
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Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby Buc2 » Thu Feb 23, 2017 12:59 pm

1956 - 5MB IBM hard drive
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2017 - 1TB Western Digital hard drive
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Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby Zarniwoop » Thu Feb 23, 2017 3:48 pm

Finally empirical proof of what Ive been telling my girlfriend for years -- smaller is better!!!
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Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby paco74 » Fri Feb 24, 2017 10:16 am

I love this thread! HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA!
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Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby Buc You » Fri Feb 24, 2017 11:59 am

Zarniwoop wrote:Finally empirical proof of what Ive been telling my girlfriend for years -- smaller is better!!!

I think you have the analogy mixed up.

Putting a measly 5MB in that giant box leaves everyone disappointed. Stuffing 1TB in that tiny box makes everyone happy.
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Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby Buc2 » Fri Mar 03, 2017 2:40 pm

Lithium-Ion Battery Inventor Introduces New Technology for Fast-Charging, Noncombustible Batteries

A team of engineers led by 94-year-old John Goodenough, professor in the Cockrell School of Engineering at The University of Texas at Austin and co-inventor of the lithium-ion battery, has developed the first all-solid-state battery cells that could lead to safer, faster-charging, longer-lasting rechargeable batteries for handheld mobile devices, electric cars and stationary energy storage.

Goodenough’s latest breakthrough, completed with Cockrell School senior research fellow Maria Helena Braga, is a low-cost all-solid-state battery that is noncombustible and has a long cycle life (battery life) with a high volumetric energy density and fast rates of charge and discharge. The engineers describe their new technology in a recent paper published in the journal Energy & Environmental Science.

“Cost, safety, energy density, rates of charge and discharge and cycle life are critical for battery-driven cars to be more widely adopted. We believe our discovery solves many of the problems that are inherent in today’s batteries,” Goodenough said.

The researchers demonstrated that their new battery cells have at least three times as much energy density as today’s lithium-ion batteries. A battery cell’s energy density gives an electric vehicle its driving range, so a higher energy density means that a car can drive more miles between charges. The UT Austin battery formulation also allows for a greater number of charging and discharging cycles, which equates to longer-lasting batteries, as well as a faster rate of recharge (minutes rather than hours).

Today’s lithium-ion batteries use liquid electrolytes to transport the lithium ions between the anode (the negative side of the battery) and the cathode (the positive side of the battery). If a battery cell is charged too quickly, it can cause dendrites or “metal whiskers” to form and cross through the liquid electrolytes, causing a short circuit that can lead to explosions and fires. Instead of liquid electrolytes, the researchers rely on glass electrolytes that enable the use of an alkali-metal anode without the formation of dendrites.

The use of an alkali-metal anode (lithium, sodium or potassium) — which isn’t possible with conventional batteries — increases the energy density of a cathode and delivers a long cycle life. In experiments, the researchers’ cells have demonstrated more than 1,200 cycles with low cell resistance.

Additionally, because the solid-glass electrolytes can operate, or have high conductivity, at -20 degrees Celsius, this type of battery in a car could perform well in subzero degree weather. This is the first all-solid-state battery cell that can operate under 60 degree Celsius.

Braga began developing solid-glass electrolytes with colleagues while she was at the University of Porto in Portugal. About two years ago, she began collaborating with Goodenough and researcher Andrew J. Murchison at UT Austin. Braga said that Goodenough brought an understanding of the composition and properties of the solid-glass electrolytes that resulted in a new version of the electrolytes that is now patented through the UT Austin Office of Technology Commercialization.

The engineers’ glass electrolytes allow them to plate and strip alkali metals on both the cathode and the anode side without dendrites, which simplifies battery cell fabrication.

Another advantage is that the battery cells can be made from earth-friendly materials.

“The glass electrolytes allow for the substitution of low-cost sodium for lithium. Sodium is extracted from seawater that is widely available,” Braga said.

Goodenough and Braga are continuing to advance their battery-related research and are working on several patents. In the short term, they hope to work with battery makers to develop and test their new materials in electric vehicles and energy storage devices.
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Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby Kress » Sat Mar 04, 2017 7:16 am

Goodenough and Braga?
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Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby Buc2 » Thu Mar 09, 2017 8:45 am

In an Unexplained Case, Brain Activity Has Been Recorded as Much as 10 Minutes After Death
This makes no sense.
BEC CREW 8 MAR 2017

Doctors in a Canadian intensive care unit have stumbled on a very strange case - when life support was turned off for four terminal patients, one of them showed persistent brain activity even after they were declared clinically dead.

For more than 10 minutes after doctors confirmed death through a range of observations, including the absence of a pulse and unreactive pupils, the patient appeared to experience the same kind of brain waves (delta wave bursts) we get during deep sleep. And it's an entirely different phenomenon to the sudden 'death wave' that's been observed in rats following decapitation.

"In one patient, single delta wave bursts persisted following the cessation of both the cardiac rhythm and arterial blood pressure (ABP)," the team from the University of Western Ontario in Canada reports.

They also found that death could be a unique experience for each individual, noting that across the four patients, the frontal electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings of their brain activity displayed few similarities both before and after they were declared dead.

"There was a significant difference in EEG amplitude between the 30-minute period before and the 5-minute period following ABP cessation for the group," the researchers explain.

Before we get into the actual findings, the researchers are being very cautious about the implications, saying it's far too early to be talking about what this could mean for our post-death experience, especially considering their sample size is one.

In the absence of any biological explanation for how brain activity could possibly continue several minutes after the heart has stopped beating, the researchers say the scan could be the result of some kind of error at the time of recording.

But they're at a loss to explain what that error could be, as the medical equipment show no signs of malfunction, meaning the source of the anomaly cannot be confirmed - biologically or otherwise.

"It is difficult to posit a physiological basis for this EEG activity given that it occurs after a prolonged loss of circulation," the researchers write.

"These waveform bursts could, therefore, be artefactual [human error] in nature, although an artefactual source could not be identified."

You can see the brain scans of the four terminal patients below, showing the moment of clinical death at Time 0, or when the heart had stopped a few minutes after life support had been turned off:

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brain-waves-deaths
Norton et al. (2017)

The yellow brain activity is what we're looking for in these scans (view a larger version here), and you can see in three of the four patients, this activity faded away before the heart stopped beating - as much as 10 minutes before clinical death, in the case of patient #2.

But for some reason, patient #4 shows evidence of delta wave bursts for 10 minutes and 38 seconds after their heart had stopped.

The researchers also investigated if a phenomenon known as 'death waves' occurred in the patients - in 2011, a separate team observed a burst of brain activity in rat brains about 1 minute after decapitation, suggesting that the brain and the heart have different moments of expiration.

"It seems that the massive wave which can be recorded approximately 1 minute after decapitation reflects the ultimate border between life and death," researchers from Radboud University in the Netherlands reported at the time.

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death-wave
Bas-Jan Zandt et al. (2011)

When the Canadian team looked for this phenomenon in their human patients, they came up empty. "We did not observe a delta wave within 1 minute following cardiac arrest in any of our four patients," they report.

If all of this feels frustratingly inconsequential, welcome to the strange and incredibly niche field of necroneuroscience, where no one really knows what's actually going on.

But what we do know is that very strange things can happen at the moment of death - and afterwards - with a pair of studies from 2016 finding that more than 1,000 genes were still functioning several days after death in human cadavers.

And it wasn't like they were taking longer than everything else to sputter out - they actually increased their activity following the moment of clinical death.

The big takeaway from studies like these isn't that we understand more about the post-death experience now than we did before, because the observations remain inconclusive and without biological explanation.

But what they do show is that we've got so much to figure out when it comes to the process of death, and how we - and other animals - actually experience it, from our bodies to our brains.

The research has been published in The Canadian Journal of Neurological Sciences.
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Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby Zarniwoop » Thu Mar 09, 2017 9:41 am

Those scientists need to register for this forum...they will have plenty of brain dead patients to exam
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Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby Selmon Rules » Fri Mar 10, 2017 5:35 pm

Zarniwoop wrote:Those scientists need to register for this forum...they will have plenty of brain dead patients to exam

Problem isn't being brain dead, problem is that they keep replying to posts....
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Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby Corsair » Mon Mar 13, 2017 4:47 pm

Great Barrier Reef dead at 25 million

The Great Barrier Reef has been declared dead by scientists at 25 million years old — bringing an end to the colorful life of the world’s largest single structure of living organisms.

The incredible Coral Sea wilderness, which stretches for roughly 1,400 miles over an area of roughly 133,00 square miles, has finally succumbed to bleaching.

The icon of the natural world is bigger than the whole of the United Kingdom and is composed of over 2,900 individual reefs and 900 islands.

It is home to 1,625 species of fish, 3,000 mollusks, and 30 different types of whales and dolphins.

The reef lies off the coast of Queensland in Australia and can be seen from outer space.

Leading environmentalist writer Rowan Jacobsen declared the incredible structure dead, and wrote: “The Great Barrier Reef of Australia passed away in 2016 after a long illness.

“It was 25 million years old.”

The reef is commonly referred to as the world’s largest living thing but it is actually made up of billions of tiny organisms.

The world’s largest living thing is a 2.4-mile-wide honey fungus stretching across the Blue Mountains in Oregon.

The Great Barrier Reef has been declared dead by scientists investigating coral bleaching, which is caused by environment stress impacts.

The warming of the oceans because of climate change causes corals to expel their algae and become bare.

Without the algae, the coral can’t get any nutrients.

The Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority has started the second phase of its survey to assess the impact of 2016’s bleaching.

The research showed that “22 percent of the coral on the reef died due to the worst mass bleaching event on record.”

Eighty-five percent of the mortality occurred in a 370-mile stretch of reef between the tip of Cape York and just north of Lizard Island.

The death of the Great Barrier Reef follows years of anxiety in the scientific community about how long it had left.

In 2009, the chief scientist of the Australian Institute of Marine Science, Charles Veron, held a talk called “Is the Great Barrier Reef on Death Row?”

Jacobsen wrote an obituary for the reef in Outside, in which he quoted Veron as saying:”The whole northern section is trashed.

“It looks like a war zone.”

“It’s heartbreaking.”

“I used to have the best job in the world.”

“Now it’s turned sour.”
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Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby Nano » Mon Mar 13, 2017 8:06 pm

If the reef is dead, then we have no more use for Australia anymore.







Lets nuke em
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Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby RedLeader » Tue Mar 14, 2017 9:18 pm

Damn you, Grim!!
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Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby flashgordon » Sun Mar 19, 2017 2:48 pm

http://wwwscientifichumanism.blogspot.c ... onomy.html

This blog post starts with the latest Ancient Aliens talk. In the replies section is some of the latest, most exciting science news. I started putting the latest science news in the replies section. I left out a lot of nanotech and quantum computers stuff(I actually put one in there), because I get a lot of Russian and Chinese traffic. I get no replies; so, I'm not sure who my viewers are. They have other avenues to find out the latest technological and military developments; but, I guess they'll go find it anyway they can to steal secrets and such!
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Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby Buc2 » Sat Mar 25, 2017 10:34 am

Astronaut who walked on the moon: ‘why I know aliens haven’t visited Earth’
HE was an astronaut on the second manned mission to the moon and the fourth man to walk on its surface.

Alan Bean, 85, is one of only 12 people to have taken “one small step for man and one giant leap for mankind” on the moon.

The lunar module pilot was one of two crew members on-board Apollo 12 who walked on the moon days after it launched on November 14, 1969.

The crew’s primary mission objectives included an extensive series of lunar exploration tasks by the lunar module and the deployment of the Apollo Lunar Surface Experiments Package to be left on the moon’s surface to gather seismic, scientific and engineering data.

Mr Bean has logged 1,671 hours and 45 minutes in space — 10 hours and 26 minutes of that were spent on the moon and in Earth’s orbit.

His experiences in space have led Mr Bean to develop some interesting theories about the possibility of alien life.

“I do not believe that anyone from outer space has ever visited the Earth,” Mr Bean told news.com.au from his home in Houston, Texas.

“One of reasons I don’t believe they have been here is that civilisations that are more advanced are more altruistic and friendly — like Earth, which is better than it used to be — so they would have landed and said ‘we come in peace and we know from our studies you have cancer that kills people, we solved that problem 50 years ago, here’s the gadget we put on a person’s chest that will cure it, we will show you how to make it’.

“Just like some day, say 1000 years from now, when we can go to another star and see a planet, that’s what we would do because we will know how to cure cancer, cure birth defects, so we would teach them.”

Mr Bean doesn’t doubt for a second that we are not alone.

“There’s so many billions of stars and these stars have planets around them so there must be statistically many planets around many stars that have formed life,” he said.
“Maybe some of them are like our life was 100,000 years ago, and some of them are like we are now, and there are probably some out there that are a 10,000 years in the future from where we are now.”

{Click on link above to continue reading}
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Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby flashgordon » Sat Mar 25, 2017 12:09 pm

I was just reading some media person's version of this Alan Bean. I was half expecting him to say that he saw E.T.'s out there. The points brought up by him are not new; but, it's good to hear him say these ideas about E.T.'s.
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Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby flashgordon » Sat Mar 25, 2017 12:15 pm

The most exciting, recent science news I can think of is how the merging of two different massed black holes created enough gravitational waves on one side of the merger to push the resulting black hole out of the merging galaxies themselves!

http://hubblesite.org/news_release/news/2017-12
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Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby flashgordon » Sat Mar 25, 2017 12:23 pm

Well, here's a good article on Olmec society evoilution - http://www.archaeology.org/issues/249-1 ... government

Always seemed that one couldn't get to know anything about the Olmecs. In fact, archaeology of the new world cultures(from Western culture perspective) has been advancing rapidly. I did a little bit of a write-up about the latest Archaeology of the Americas - http://wwwscientifichumanism.blogspot.c ... d-new.html
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Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby flashgordon » Sat Mar 25, 2017 12:38 pm

Here's a podcast of geologic findings of solar system chaos - https://www.scientificamerican.com/podc ... TW_SPC_POD

It was my understanding that chaotic dynamics happens in the solar system on the order of hundreds of millions of years - not just one or two million years.

Geologists are always finding astronomical affects on the Earth's geology. From the layered patterns in the sand from the oceans tides, to tree rings. They've found layered rocks that can date solar cycle and suggest just how stable our star has been, to choral reefs that show the moon was much closer early on.
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Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby flashgordon » Sat Mar 25, 2017 12:42 pm

Science magazine think that by solving this dna problem, one can protect astronauts on their way to Mars! - http://science.sciencemag.org/content/3 ... ssue-11944
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Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby flashgordon » Sat Mar 25, 2017 12:47 pm

Kindof like astronomers finding primordial solar system matter and being able to date the solar system by meteorites and asteroids, they've found primordial matter - almost pure hydrogen worlds in Brown dwarfs. Objects bigger than Jupiter but not big enough to ignite fusion energy cores.

https://phys.org/news/2017-03-astronome ... dwarf.html

See after the big bang, the majority of matter was in the form of hydrogen and helium. Only after the first generation of supernova, was there heavier elements like carbon, oxygen, iron, gold and so on . . . to form rocky planets. Our star/solar system is second generation - we come after two supernovas.
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Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby flashgordon » Sat Mar 25, 2017 12:50 pm

The latest image from Juno spacecraft around Jupiter - https://www.nasa.gov/feature/jpl/nasa-s ... iter-flyby
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Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby Kress » Sun Mar 26, 2017 10:39 pm

Buc2 wrote:
Astronaut who walked on the moon: ‘why I know aliens haven’t visited Earth’
HE was an astronaut on the second manned mission to the moon and the fourth man to walk on its surface.

Alan Bean, 85, is one of only 12 people to have taken “one small step for man and one giant leap for mankind” on the moon.

The lunar module pilot was one of two crew members on-board Apollo 12 who walked on the moon days after it launched on November 14, 1969.

The crew’s primary mission objectives included an extensive series of lunar exploration tasks by the lunar module and the deployment of the Apollo Lunar Surface Experiments Package to be left on the moon’s surface to gather seismic, scientific and engineering data.

Mr Bean has logged 1,671 hours and 45 minutes in space — 10 hours and 26 minutes of that were spent on the moon and in Earth’s orbit.

His experiences in space have led Mr Bean to develop some interesting theories about the possibility of alien life.

“I do not believe that anyone from outer space has ever visited the Earth,” Mr Bean told news.com.au from his home in Houston, Texas.

“One of reasons I don’t believe they have been here is that civilisations that are more advanced are more altruistic and friendly — like Earth, which is better than it used to be — so they would have landed and said ‘we come in peace and we know from our studies you have cancer that kills people, we solved that problem 50 years ago, here’s the gadget we put on a person’s chest that will cure it, we will show you how to make it’.

“Just like some day, say 1000 years from now, when we can go to another star and see a planet, that’s what we would do because we will know how to cure cancer, cure birth defects, so we would teach them.”

Mr Bean doesn’t doubt for a second that we are not alone.

“There’s so many billions of stars and these stars have planets around them so there must be statistically many planets around many stars that have formed life,” he said.
“Maybe some of them are like our life was 100,000 years ago, and some of them are like we are now, and there are probably some out there that are a 10,000 years in the future from where we are now.”

{Click on link above to continue reading}



Of course we are not alone. It would be ignorant to think that we are.

And also, the quote should have been, "one small step for A man." Changes the whole meaning. He fucked it up.
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Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby flashgordon » Tue Apr 11, 2017 5:15 pm

Vantablack, the blackest material ever produced(it's actually a bunch of nanotubes all aligned). https://phys.org/news/2017-04-version-v ... acker.html

Vantablack can make for a revolution in astronomical spectroscopes(or spectrometers used for other purposes as well), comparable to the ccd revolution of the 1980s. Ccd's replaced the old photographic film. CCD's then made for smart phones.

- I remember the Vantablack news a few years ago; I was afraid I'd never hear about it again. One observation of mine, from actively watching the latest science news(so much more exciting than watching political news), is that if it's important, it'll come around again. Something else that's come around again is this programmable rna vaccine technology - say goodbye to cancer and viruses!

https://scitechdaily.com/programmable-r ... ika-virus/

- the effort to image a blackhole(or, at least, it's event horizon) seems to have gone off without a hitch - https://blogs.scientificamerican.com/da ... W_SPC_BLOG I guess we'll see if they can get the south pole data without any problems!
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Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby flashgordon » Tue Apr 11, 2017 5:26 pm

Everyone has heard of vertical angles, right? Here's a great generalization - https://www.quantamagazine.org/20170411 ... nes-proof/ The article starts out with an icosahedron/3d generalization. Then, they talk about having to use Ramsey's theorem to prove these generalizations in all higher dimensions!

- New Horizon's spacecraft, the same spacecraft that pictures Pluto for the first time(in much greater detail), has done some Cosmic background radiation measurements, unpolluted by the inner solar system light! https://phys.org/news/2017-04-scientist ... izons.html It'll be a long time till we get a Hubble space telescope out past Pluto!

- No magnetic monopoles because of gravity - https://phys.org/news/2017-04-physicist ... amics.html

- the boomerang nebula as the coldest place in the Universe(that's known so far)? Hopefully, this link works to see the picture - https://pbs.twimg.com/media/C9Epuv5XUAAS49a.jpg

- Genetics shows that jellyfish are earlier species than sponges - https://phys.org/news/2017-04-sponges-e ... llies.html

- a slowly erupting supernova? https://www.universetoday.com/134879/st ... iscovered/

- Astronomers think they're close to finding Mike Brown and Konstatin's Planet 9(or 10 if you're counting pluto) - https://www.scientificamerican.com/arti ... W_SPC_NEWS

- Mathematicians have been solving some pretty big problems in the last few decades - from the four volume(thousand page each) proof of the classification of finite groups, to Fermat's last theorem, to the Poincare's conjecture. Is the Riemann hypotheses not far behind? Well, maybe this is one proof - https://www.quantamagazine.org/20170404 ... ypothesis/
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Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby Corsair » Mon Apr 24, 2017 2:14 am

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Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby beardmcdoug » Mon Apr 24, 2017 7:37 am

Corsair wrote:


lol Bill has just had enough of that ****. Pretty remarkable, that William Happer guy. He's obviously a very smart guy, judging by his CV. The guy is feigning a lack of understanding of very basic chemical/biological fundamentals though, which would be pretty embarrassing to do on your own accord. I'm sure there's a nice boost to his grant funding or retirement fund lining his words. Really is a shame how easily people can be compromised...
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Re: The Science & Technology Thread

Postby deltbucs » Mon Apr 24, 2017 7:57 am

beardmcdoug wrote:
Corsair wrote:


lol Bill has just had enough of that ****. Pretty remarkable, that William Happer guy. He's obviously a very smart guy, judging by his CV. The guy is feigning a lack of understanding of very basic chemical/biological fundamentals though, which would be pretty embarrassing to do on your own accord. I'm sure there's a nice boost to his grant funding or retirement fund lining his words. Really is a shame how easily people can be compromised...

^^^ Yep
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