The Photography Thread

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Re: The Photography Thread

Postby IronDog » Fri Dec 01, 2017 12:48 pm

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This picturesque view from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope peers into the distant universe to reveal a galaxy cluster called Abell 2537.

Galaxy clusters such as this one contain thousands of galaxies of all ages, shapes and sizes, together totaling a mass thousands of times greater than that of the Milky Way. These groupings of galaxies are colossal — they are the largest structures in the Universe to be held together by their own gravity.

Clusters are useful in probing mysterious cosmic phenomena like dark energy and dark matter, which can contort space itself. There is so much matter stuffed into a cluster like Abell 2537 that its gravity has visible effects on its surroundings. Abell 2537’s gravity warps the very structure of its environment (spacetime), causing light to travel along distorted paths through space. This phenomenon can produce a magnifying effect, allowing us to see faint objects that lie far behind the cluster and are thus otherwise unobservable from Earth. Abell 2537 is a particularly efficient lens, as demonstrated by the stretched stripes and streaking arcs visible in the frame. These smeared shapes are in fact galaxies, their light heavily distorted by the gravitational field of Abell 2537.

This spectacular scene was captured by Hubble’s Advanced Camera for Surveys and Wide-Field Camera 3 as part of an observing program called RELICS.

Credit: ESA/Hubble/NASA
Text Credit: European Space Agency

Last Updated: Dec. 1, 2017
Editor: Karl Hille
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Re: The Photography Thread

Postby IronDog » Tue Dec 12, 2017 3:09 pm

Purty

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Where do most of the elements essential for life on Earth come from? The answer: inside the furnaces of stars and the explosions that mark the end of some stars’ lives.

Astronomers have long studied exploded stars and their remains – known as “supernova remnants” – to better understand exactly how stars produce and then disseminate many of the elements observed on Earth, and in the cosmos at large.

Due to its unique evolutionary status, Cassiopeia A (Cas A) is one of the most intensely studied of these supernova remnants. A new image from NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory shows the location of different elements in the remains of the explosion: silicon (red), sulfur (yellow), calcium (green) and iron (purple). Each of these elements produces X-rays within narrow energy ranges, allowing maps of their location to be created. The blast wave from the explosion is seen as the blue outer ring.

X-ray telescopes such as Chandra are important to study supernova remnants and the elements they produce because these events generate extremely high temperatures – millions of degrees – even thousands of years after the explosion. This means that many supernova remnants, including Cas A, glow most strongly at X-ray wavelengths that are undetectable with other types of telescopes.


Chandra’s sharp X-ray vision allows astronomers to gather detailed information about the elements that objects like Cas A produce. For example, they are not only able to identify many of the elements that are present, but how much of each are being expelled into interstellar space. 



The Chandra data indicate that the supernova that produced Cas A has churned out prodigious amounts of key cosmic ingredients. Cas A has dispersed about 10,000 Earth masses worth of sulfur alone, and about 20,000 Earth masses of silicon. The iron in Cas A has the mass of about 70,000 times that of the Earth, and astronomers detect a whopping one million Earth masses worth of oxygen being ejected into space from Cas A, equivalent to about three times the mass of the sun. (Even though oxygen is the most abundant element in Cas A, its X-ray emission is spread across a wide range of energies and cannot be isolated in this image, unlike with the other elements that are shown.)



Astronomers have found other elements in Cas A in addition to the ones shown in this new Chandra image. Carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus and hydrogen have also been detected using various telescopes that observe different parts of the electromagnetic spectrum. Combined with the detection of oxygen, this means all of the elements needed to make DNA, the molecule that carries genetic information, are found in Cas A.



Oxygen is the most abundant element in the human body (about 65% by mass), calcium helps form and maintain healthy bones and teeth, and iron is a vital part of red blood cells that carry oxygen through the body. All of the oxygen in the Solar System comes from exploding massive stars. About half of the calcium and about 40% of the iron also come from these explosions, with the balance of these elements being supplied by explosions of smaller mass, white dwarf stars. 



While the exact date is not confirmed, many experts think that the stellar explosion that created Cas A occurred around the year 1680 in Earth’s timeframe. Astronomers estimate that the doomed star was about five times the mass of the Sun just before it exploded. The star is estimated to have started its life with a mass about 16 times that of the Sun, and lost roughly two-thirds of this mass in a vigorous wind blowing off the star several hundred thousand years before the explosion.



Earlier in its lifetime, the star began fusing hydrogen and helium in its core into heavier elements through the process known as “nucleosynthesis.” The energy made by the fusion of heavier and heavier elements balanced the star against the force of gravity. These reactions continued until they formed iron in the core of the star. At this point, further nucleosynthesis would consume rather than produce energy, so gravity then caused the star to implode and form a dense stellar core known as a neutron star.

The exact means by which a massive explosion is produced after the implosion is complicated, and a subject of intense study, but eventually the infalling material outside the neutron star was transformed by further nuclear reactions as it was expelled outward by the supernova explosion.

Chandra has repeatedly observed Cas A since the telescope was launched into space in 1999. The different datasets have revealed new information about the neutron star in Cas A, the details of the explosion, and specifics of how the debris is ejected into space.



NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, manages the Chandra program for NASA's Science Mission Directorate in Washington. The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory in Cambridge, Massachusetts, controls Chandra's science and flight operations.

Image credit: NASA/CXC/SAO
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Re: The Photography Thread

Postby Mountaineer Buc » Tue Dec 12, 2017 4:09 pm

That pic reminded me of the Helix Nebula or as it more commonly known "The eye of God"










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Re: The Photography Thread

Postby IronDog » Mon Dec 18, 2017 12:34 pm

running as fast as I could, this yayhoo almost got away from me....

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When NASA’s next X-plane takes to the skies, it will produce some pretty cool images.

Thanks to the completion of a recent flight test series at NASA’s Armstrong Flight Research Center in California, the agency is a step closer to being able to visually capture the shockwaves of NASA’s future Low Boom Flight Demonstration aircraft, or LBFD.

In this schlieren image, an Air Force Test Pilot School T-38 is shown in a transonic state, meaning the aircraft is transitioning from a subsonic speed to supersonic. Above and beneath the aircraft, shockwaves are seen starting to form. These shockwaves propagate away from the aircraft and are heard on the ground as a sonic boom. NASA researchers use this imagery to study these shockwaves as part of the effort to make sonic booms quieter, which may open the future to possible supersonic flight over land.

Learn more about supersonic aircraft https://www.nasa.gov/centers/armstrong/feature/NASA_advances_schlieren_imagery_for_supersonic_aircraft.html.

Image Credit: NASA


Neat! I clicked the link at the end and they have a video showing how they took this shot. Had the T-38 cross right in front of the sun and the shock waves are clearly visible. Purty Nifty.
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Re: The Photography Thread

Postby IronDog » Wed Dec 20, 2017 5:22 pm

A little nighttime romance from above

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"Hello Little Rock, Memphis, Jackson, New Orleans, Birmingham, Miami, and many places in between! #SpaceIsCloserThanYouThink" So ran the greeting from @Astro_Sabot, otherwise known as Mark Vande Hei, with this image taken from aboard the International Space Station https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/station/main/index.html, orbiting 250 miles above the planet we call home.

Vande Hei and his crewmates on the station are not only conducting cutting-edge research aboard the orbital laboratory; their images of Earth help monitor conditions on Earth, and also showcase its beauty.

For more images, visit Gateway to Astronaut Photography of Earth https://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/.

Image Credit: NASA/Mark Vande Hei
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Re: The Photography Thread

Postby Noles1724 » Wed Dec 20, 2017 6:16 pm

IronDog wrote:A little nighttime romance from above

Image

"Hello Little Rock, Memphis, Jackson, New Orleans, Birmingham, Miami, and many places in between! #SpaceIsCloserThanYouThink" So ran the greeting from @Astro_Sabot, otherwise known as Mark Vande Hei, with this image taken from aboard the International Space Station https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/station/main/index.html, orbiting 250 miles above the planet we call home.

Vande Hei and his crewmates on the station are not only conducting cutting-edge research aboard the orbital laboratory; their images of Earth help monitor conditions on Earth, and also showcase its beauty.

For more images, visit Gateway to Astronaut Photography of Earth https://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/.

Image Credit: NASA/Mark Vande Hei


Doesn't look flat to me
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Re: The Photography Thread

Postby Kress » Wed Dec 20, 2017 8:49 pm

Noles1724 wrote:
IronDog wrote:A little nighttime romance from above

Image



Doesn't look flat to me



Launch your own steam powered rocket. Then you will see. And then fall off the edge, so that will suck for you.
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Re: The Photography Thread

Postby IronDog » Fri Dec 22, 2017 11:49 am

And a Merry Christmas/Happy Holiday to you from Deep Space

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The Hubble Space Telescope captured what looks like a colorful holiday ornament in space. It's actually an image of NGC 6326, a planetary nebula with glowing wisps of outpouring gas that are lit up by a central star nearing the end of its life.

When a star ages and the red giant phase of its life comes to an end, it starts to eject layers of gas from its surface leaving behind a hot and compact white dwarf. Sometimes this ejection results in elegantly symmetric patterns of glowing gas, but NGC 6326 is much less structured. This object is located in the constellation of Ara, the Altar, about 11,000 light-years from Earth.

Planetary nebulae are one of the main ways in which elements heavier than hydrogen and helium are dispersed into space after their creation in the hearts of stars. Eventually some of this out-flung material may form new stars and planets.

This picture was created from images taken using the Hubble Space Telescope’s Wide Field Planetary Camera 2. The vivid blue and red hues come from material including ionized oxygen and hydrogen glowing under the action of the fierce ultraviolet radiation from the still hot central star.

Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA
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Re: The Photography Thread

Postby IronDog » Thu Jan 11, 2018 2:28 pm

So......Where to go next.....

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A new analysis of about 10,000 normal Sun-like stars in the central hub of the Milky Way reveals that our galaxy’s bulge is a dynamic environment of stars of various ages zipping around at different speeds. This conclusion is based on nine years’ worth of archival data from the Hubble Space Telescope. This study of the complicated, chaotic heart of our Milky Way may provide new clues to the evolution of our galaxy and its merger with smaller satellite galaxies. Currently, only Hubble has sharp enough resolution to simultaneously measure the motions of thousands of Sun-like stars at the galaxy bulge's distance from Earth over time. Hubble gives a narrow, pencil-beam view of the galaxy’s core to unveil thousands more stars than those spotted in earlier studies.

Image Credit: NASA, ESA, and T. Brown (STScI)
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Re: The Photography Thread

Postby IronDog » Fri Feb 02, 2018 1:24 pm

One step closer to deployment...(but damn that's cold)

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Taken from inside Chamber A at the Johnson Space Center in Houston in September 2017 while the combined optical and science instrument element of the James Webb Space Telescope (https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/webb/main/index.html) was undergoing cryogenic testing, the temperature at the time this image was taken was approximately 50 kelvins (about -369.7 degrees Fahrenheit/-223.2 degrees Celsius). The camera that captured this image was placed inside the chamber to measure the telescope’s alignment, but engineers also used it to monitor the black DuPont™ Kapton® covering that outlines Webb’s primary mirror. Engineers used this and other images to assess the material’s slack as the telescope shrank ever so slightly in the extreme cold of the chamber.

Once Webb is fully deployed and in orbit at the second Lagrange point (L2)(https://www.nasa.gov/topics/universe/features/webb-l2.html), this Kapton® “wreath” around the primary mirror will block unwanted light from behind the telescope from interfering with its observations. There are five so-called "Lagrange Points" - areas where gravity from the Sun and Earth balance the orbital motion of a satellite. Putting a spacecraft at any of these points allows it to stay in a fixed position relative to the Earth and Sun with a minimal amount of energy needed for course correction.

In the photo, you can see each of Webb’s 18 hexagonal primary mirror segments, though the ones further from the camera quickly fade into darkness. The bright elements in the photo — the “stars” that seem to envelope Webb within the chamber — are targets that were used to measure extremely precise movements of the telescope as it cooled. Those targets appear so bright because this photo had a very long exposure time.

Webb’s combined optical and science instrument element completed cryogenic testing inside the chamber in November 2017.

Image Credit: NASA/Chris Gunn
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Re: The Photography Thread

Postby IronDog » Fri Mar 23, 2018 3:00 pm

Pretty blues

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The exquisite sharpness of this 2005 image from NASA/ESA's Hubble Space Telescope has plucked out an underlying population of infant stars embedded in the nebula NGC 346 that are still forming from gravitationally collapsing gas clouds. They have not yet ignited their hydrogen fuel to sustain nuclear fusion. The smallest of these infant stars is only half the mass of our Sun.

Credit: NASA, ESA and A. Nota (STScI/ESA)
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Re: The Photography Thread

Postby IronDog » Wed Apr 11, 2018 1:40 pm

A little direct and indirect sun play

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"Sunrise crashes an aurora party over the southern hemisphere," said astronaut Ricky Arnold of the image he snapped from the International Space Station.

Auroras are one of the many Earthly phenomena the crew of the space station observe from their perch high above the planet. The dancing lights of auroras provide spectacular views, but also capture the imagination of scientists who study incoming energy and particles from our Sun. Auroras are one effect of such energetic particles, which can speed out from the Sun both in a steady stream called the solar wind or from giant eruptions known as coronal mass ejections or CMEs. After a trip toward Earth that can last three days, the solar particles and magnetic fields cause the release of particles already trapped near Earth, which in turn trigger reactions in the upper atmosphere in which oxygen and nitrogen molecules release photons of light. The result: the Northern and Southern lights.

Image Credit: NASA
Last Updated: April 11, 2018
Editor: Yvette Smith
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Re: The Photography Thread

Postby Buc2 » Mon Jul 23, 2018 9:21 am

Some pics (all by professional photog, Trevor Mahlmann) from the early morning launch of a Falcon 9 rocket carrying a Telstar satellite to low-earth orbit (1:50am EDT today)...

Launch
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Going supersonic
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https://photos.tmahlmann.com/Rockets/Sp ... 9-Vantage/
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Re: The Photography Thread

Postby Buc2 » Sat Jul 28, 2018 2:29 pm

This is the best weekend of the year to see the planet Mars. That’s because Mars and the sun are aligned in opposition on July 27. When that happens, the planet shines extra bright in the night sky. What’s more, the opposition occurs just a few days before Earth and Mars reach their closest approach to one another, on July 31. This makes Mars appear slightly bigger in the sky than it normally would.

NASA recently took advantage of Mars growing bigger and brighter in the night sky and turned the Hubble Space Telescope to snap this photo of the planet on June 6.

Behold Mars, the cheddar-colored marble.

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NASA, ESA, and STScI

One thing to notice in this photo: Mars is nearly completely covered by a planet-wide dust storm, occluding the details of the planet’s geography.

Two years ago, Hubble took a similar photo, but dust wasn’t in the way. Here’s what it saw. You can make out Mars’s great basins, valleys, and craters.

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NASA/Hubble

The Hubble Space Telescope recently took advantage of another special opportunity: Saturn in perfect position to show off its glorious rings. This picture was taken on June 6, three weeks before Saturn reached opposition. At this moment, it was nearing its maximum tilt, meaning it was angled in such a way that its rings were illuminated by loads of sunlight.

In this photo, you can also make out the hexagonal storm that encircles Saturn’s north pole.

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NASA, ESA, Amy Simon and the OPAL Team, and J. DePasquale (STScI)
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Re: The Photography Thread

Postby IronDog » Thu Aug 02, 2018 3:03 pm

Ummm, is my browser acting up? I don't see you photos, B2. I was gonna say that I don't see the images, but I know damn well the NYBF would get all up in my face and point out that it says image at least 4 times.
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Re: The Photography Thread

Postby Buc2 » Thu Aug 02, 2018 3:05 pm

IronDog wrote:Ummm, is my browser acting up? I don't see you photos, B2. I was gonna say that I don't see the images, but I know damn well the NYBF would get all up in my face and point out that it says image at least 4 times.

Hmm...I can see them. Oh well. Just click on the link to the story (first sentence in my post).
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Re: The Photography Thread

Postby IronDog » Wed Aug 15, 2018 11:16 am

Image

Ever wondered what auroras look like from space? Astronaut Alexander Gerst, also known as @Astro_Alex, gives us his bird's-eye view from aboard the International Space Station, tweeting that the experience is "[m]ind-blowing, every single time."

The dancing lights of the auroras provide spectacular views on the ground and from space, but also capture the imagination of scientists who study incoming energy and particles from the Sun. Auroras are one effect of such energetic particles, which can speed out from the sun both in a steady stream called the solar wind and due to giant eruptions known as coronal mass ejections. After a trip toward Earth that can last 2 or 3 days, the solar particles and magnetic fields cause the release of particles already trapped near Earth, which in turn trigger reactions in the upper atmosphere in which oxygen and nitrogen molecules release photons of light. The result: the Northern and Southern lights.

Image Credit: ESA/NASA-A.Gerst
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Re: The Photography Thread

Postby IronDog » Wed Aug 15, 2018 12:01 pm

one of my office mates turned me on to an ap from the ISS. it is called ISS HD Live and I posted about it in the Nerdery
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Re: The Photography Thread

Postby Caradoc » Thu Aug 16, 2018 5:54 pm

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Re: The Photography Thread

Postby Mountaineer Buc » Thu Aug 16, 2018 8:08 pm

That is cool as hell.
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Re: The Photography Thread

Postby Kress » Fri Aug 17, 2018 7:22 am

I like what somebody did mirroring it:


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I don't know what that is, but I'm damn sure afraid of it.
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Re: The Photography Thread

Postby Buc2 » Sun Aug 19, 2018 1:20 pm

The latest Hubble photo is pretty damned awesome. Click on the link if you want to view the pic in full screen+ mode. I said full screen+ because you will probably still have to scroll down a little to view it all.

Aug. 16, 2018
Hubble Paints Picture of the Evolving Universe
Astronomers using the ultraviolet vision of NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope have captured one of the largest panoramic views of the fire and fury of star birth in the distant universe. The field features approximately 15,000 galaxies, about 12,000 of which are forming stars. Hubble’s ultraviolet vision opens a new window on the evolving universe, tracking the birth of stars over the last 11 billion years back to the cosmos’ busiest star-forming period, which happened about 3 billion years after the big bang.

Ultraviolet light has been the missing piece to the cosmic puzzle. Now, combined with infrared and visible-light data from Hubble and other space and ground-based telescopes, astronomers have assembled one of the most comprehensive portraits yet of the universe’s evolutionary history.

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Astronomers have just assembled one of the most comprehensive portraits yet of the universe’s evolutionary history, based on a broad spectrum of observations by the Hubble Space Telescope and other space and ground-based telescopes. In particular, Hubble’s ultraviolet vision opens a new window on the evolving universe, tracking the birth of stars over the last 11 billion years back to the cosmos’ busiest star-forming period, about 3 billion years after the big bang. This photo encompasses a sea of approximately 15,000 galaxies — 12,000 of which are star-forming — widely distributed in time and space. This mosaic is 14 times the area of the Hubble Ultra Violet Ultra Deep Field released in 2014.
Credits: NASA, ESA, P. Oesch (University of Geneva), and M. Montes (University of New South Wales)


The image straddles the gap between the very distant galaxies, which can only be viewed in infrared light, and closer galaxies, which can be seen across a broad spectrum. The light from distant star-forming regions in remote galaxies started out as ultraviolet. However, the expansion of the universe has shifted the light into infrared wavelengths. By comparing images of star formation in the distant and nearby universe, astronomers glean a better understanding of how nearby galaxies grew from small clumps of hot, young stars long ago.

Because Earth’s atmosphere filters most ultraviolet light, Hubble can provide some of the most sensitive space-based ultraviolet observations possible.
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Re: The Photography Thread

Postby DreadNaught » Thu Sep 27, 2018 1:30 pm

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Re: The Photography Thread

Postby Mountaineer Buc » Thu Sep 27, 2018 1:40 pm

DreadNaught wrote:Image


We all know that the moon cycle and the menstrual cycle are of the same length of duration and there are some theories that speculate the two are linked, but there is aspect of the lunar cycle in nature that is unnoticed by many.

Note that the position of the moon during its phase cycle moves in such a way as to create half of the infinity symbol, which as we know means "without beginning or end." The fact that half of an infinity symbol is created by the moon every 28 days serves to inform all of mankind that she's about to drop an egg and it's going to seem like it's going to last forever.
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Re: The Photography Thread

Postby DreadNaught » Thu Sep 27, 2018 1:44 pm

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Re: The Photography Thread

Postby IronDog » Thu Oct 11, 2018 11:35 am

Sun Spots anyone? Nah!

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This composite image, made from nine frames, shows the International Space Station, with a crew of three onboard, in silhouette as it transits the Sun at roughly five miles per second, Sunday, Oct. 7, 2018. Onboard are Commander Alexander Gerst of the European Space Agency, Serena Auñón-Chancellor of NASA, and Sergey Prokopyev of Roscosmos. The trio will soon be joined by Nick Hague of NASA and Alexey Ovchinin of Roscosmos, who are scheduled to launch on October 11 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan.

Image Credit: NASA/Joel Kowsky


Um, Maybe not...

That was a short trip. Care to measure the pucker factor there???? What's that smell?

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Cosmonaut Alexey Ovchinin of Roscosmos, left, and astronaut Nick Hague of NASA, right, embrace their families after landing at the Krayniy Airport, Thursday, Oct. 11, 2018, in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Hague and Ovchinin arrived from Dzhezkazgan after Russian search and recovery teams brought them from the Soyuz landing site. During the Soyuz MS-10 spacecraft's climb to orbit an anomaly occurred, resulting in an abort downrange. The crew was quickly recovered and is in good condition.

This and additional images are available on Flickr: https://flic.kr/s/aHsmrojjig

Image Credit: NASA/Bill Ingalls
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Re: The Photography Thread

Postby Buc2 » Fri Oct 12, 2018 12:39 pm

Not a photograph but a video. From 1911 NYC. I thought it was awesome.

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Re: The Photography Thread

Postby Mountaineer Buc » Fri Oct 12, 2018 12:52 pm

That is awesome as hell. Big props to the Foley artist who gave it some sound. total time warp. Love it.
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Re: The Photography Thread

Postby IronDog » Wed Oct 17, 2018 10:46 am

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Parallel jets provide astronomers with some of the most powerful evidence that a supermassive black hole lurks in the heart of most galaxies. Some of these black holes appear to be active, gobbling up material from their surroundings and launching jets at ultra-high speeds, while others are quiescent, even dormant.

Recent observations from SOFIA, the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy, are shedding light on this question. SOFIA data indicate that magnetic fields are trapping and confining dust near the center of the active galaxy https://imagine.gsfc.nasa.gov/science/objects/active_galaxies1.html, Cygnus A, and feeding material onto the supermassive black hole at its center.

This artist’s conception of the core of Cygnus A shows the dusty donut-shaped surroundings, called a torus, and jets launching from its center. Magnetic fields are illustrated trapping the dust in the torus. These magnetic fields could be helping power the black hole hidden in the galaxy’s core by confining the dust in the torus and keeping it close enough to be gobbled up by the hungry black hole.

Image Credit: NASA/SOFIA/Lynette Cook
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Re: The Photography Thread

Postby Buc2 » Wed Oct 17, 2018 12:17 pm

IronDog wrote:
Parallel jets provide astronomers with some of the most powerful evidence that a supermassive black hole lurks in the heart of most galaxies.


That only makes sense since something has to be holding galaxies together. Great pic, btw.
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