The Photography Thread

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Re: The Photography Thread

Postby Kress » Tue May 10, 2016 8:44 am

IronDog wrote:Who watched the solar eclipse by Mercury]



I stared at the sun all day and didn't see anything. Still can't for that matter.
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Re: The Photography Thread

Postby IronDog » Tue May 10, 2016 9:00 am

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At first glance, this cosmic kaleidoscope of purple, blue and pink offers a strikingly beautiful — and serene — snapshot of the cosmos. However, this multi-colored haze actually marks the site of two colliding galaxy clusters, forming a single object known as MACS J0416.1-2403 (or MACS J0416 for short).https://frontierfields.org/meet-the-frontier-fields/macsj0416/

MACS J0416 is located about 4.3 billion light-years from Earth, in the constellation of Eridanus. This image of the cluster combines data from three different telescopes: the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/hubble/main/index.html (showing the galaxies and stars), the NASA Chandra X-ray Observatory http://chandra.si.edu/ (diffuse emission in blue), and the NRAO Jansky Very Large Array http://www.vla.nrao.edu/ (diffuse emission in pink). Each telescope shows a different element of the cluster, allowing astronomers to study MACS J0416 in detail.

As with all galaxy clusters, MACS J0416 contains a significant amount of dark matter, which leaves a detectable imprint in visible light by distorting the images of background galaxies. In this image, this dark matter appears to align well with the blue-hued hot gas, suggesting that the two clusters have not yet collided; if the clusters had already smashed into one another, the dark matter and gas would have separated. MACS J0416 also contains other features — such as a compact core of hot gas — that would likely have been disrupted had a collision already occurred.

Together with five other galaxy clusters, MACS J0416 is playing a leading role in the Hubble Frontier Fields program http://frontierfields.org/, for which this data was obtained. Owing to its huge mass, the cluster is in fact bending the light of background objects, acting as a magnifying lens. Astronomers can use this phenomenon to find galaxies that existed only hundreds of million years after the big bang.

For more information on both Frontier Fields and the phenomenon of gravitational lensing, see Hubblecast 90: The final frontier https://www.spacetelescope.org/videos/hubblecast90a/.

Text credit: European Space Agency
Image credit: NASA, ESA, CXC, NRAO/AUI/NSF, STScI, and G. Ogrean (Stanford University), Acknowledgment: NASA, ESA, and J. Lotz (STScI), and the HFF team



one, two, three, four,....

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Peering deep into the early universe, this picturesque parallel field observation http://frontierfields.org/2014/01/10/cluster-and-parallel-fields-two-for-the-price-of-one-2/ from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope reveals thousands of colorful galaxies swimming in the inky blackness of space. A few foreground stars from our own galaxy, the Milky Way, are also visible.

In October 2013 Hubble’s Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) https://www.spacetelescope.org/about/general/instruments/wfc3/ and Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) https://www.spacetelescope.org/about/general/instruments/acs/ began observing this portion of sky as part of the Frontier Fields program http://frontierfields.org/about/. This spectacular skyscape was captured during the study of the giant galaxy cluster Abell 2744
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The massive galaxy cluster Abell 2744, nicknamed Pandora's Cluster, takes on a ghostly look in this NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope view.

In this image the total starlight from the cluster has been artificially coloured blue. This reveals that not all the starlight is contained within the cities of stars — the galaxies — which appear as bright blue-white blobs. A fraction of the starlight is also dispersed throughout the cluster, as seen in the darker blue regions.

This light comes from dead galaxies. The galaxies were torn apart long ago by the cluster's gravitational forces, and their stars were scattered into what is known as intracluster space — the space between the galaxies.

These orphaned stars roam the cluster, without being gravitationally tethered to any single galaxy. Because these extremely faint stars are brightest at near-infrared wavelengths of light, this type of observation could only be accomplished with Hubble’s infrared sensitivity to extraordinarily dim light.

The galaxies that are not coloured blue are either in the foreground or background and are not part of the cluster.
, otherwise known as Pandora’s Box. While one of Hubble’s cameras concentrated on Abell 2744, the other camera viewed this adjacent patch of sky near to the cluster.

Containing countless galaxies of various ages, shapes and sizes, this parallel field observation is nearly as deep as the Hubble Ultra-Deep Field http://www.spacetelescope.org/science/deep_fields/. In addition to showcasing the stunning beauty of the deep universe in incredible detail, this parallel field — when compared to other deep fields — will help astronomers understand how similar the universe looks in different directions.

Image credit: NASA, ESA and the HST Frontier Fields team (STScI), Acknowledgement: Judy Schmidt
Text credit: European Space Agency


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In this cosmic snapshot, the spectacularly symmetrical wings of Hen 2-437 show up in a magnificent icy blue hue. Hen 2-437 is a planetary nebula, one of around 3,000 such objects known to reside within the Milky Way.

Located within the faint northern constellation of Vulpecula (The Fox), Hen 2-437 was first identified in 1946 by Rudolph Minkowski, who later also discovered the famous and equally beautiful M2-9 (otherwise known as the Twin Jet Nebula http://www.spacetelescope.org/news/heic1518/). Hen 2-437 was added to a catalog of planetary nebula over two decades later by astronomer and NASA astronaut Karl Gordon Henize.

Planetary nebulae such as Hen 2-437 form when an aging low-mass star — such as the sun — reaches the final stages of life. The star swells to become a red giant, before casting off its gaseous outer layers into space. The star itself then slowly shrinks to form a white dwarf, while the expelled gas is slowly compressed and pushed outwards by stellar winds. As shown by its remarkably beautiful appearance, Hen 2-437 is a bipolar nebula — the material ejected by the dying star has streamed out into space to create the two icy blue lobes pictured here.

Image credit: ESA (European Space Agency)/Hubble & NASA, Acknowledgement: Judy Schmidt
Text credit: ESA
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Re: The Photography Thread

Postby IronDog » Thu Jun 16, 2016 11:19 am

Purty

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Expedition 47 Flight Engineer Jeff Williams of NASA captured a series of photos on April 25, 2016, for this composite image of the setting sun reflected by the ocean.

Image Credit: NASA
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Re: The Photography Thread

Postby IronDog » Wed Jul 27, 2016 11:48 am

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This artist’s concept shows an unusual celestial object called CX330 was first detected as a source of X-ray light in 2009 by NASA’s Chandra X-Ray Observatory while it was surveying the bulge in the central region of the Milky Way. A 2016 study in the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society found that CX330 is the most isolated young star that has been discovered. Researchers compared NASA’s Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) data from 2010 with NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope data from 2007 to come to this conclusion.

CX330 is not near any star-forming region. As of the most recent observation, which was August 2015, this object was outbursting, meaning it was launching “jets” of material that slam into the gas and dust around it. Astronomers plan to continue studying the object, including with future telescopes that could view CX330 in other wavelengths of light.

For more information on WISE, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/wise

For more information on Spitzer, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/spitzer

Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
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Re: The Photography Thread

Postby IronDog » Thu Aug 25, 2016 12:19 pm

Seems Expedition 48 Commander Jeff Williams is taking shots of National Parks during his tenure in low earth orbit. Here's a collage of the Grand Canyon. Perspective, perspective, perspective.

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To celebrate the centennial of the U.S National Park Service, Expedition 48 Commander Jeff Williams of NASA has taken hundreds of images of national parks http://www.nasa.gov/content/space-station-view-of-us-national-parks from his vantage point in low Earth orbit, aboard the International Space Station. Here, a series of Williams' photographs are assembled into this composite image of the Grand Canyon. Sharing with his social media followers, Williams wrote, "The mighty @grandcanyonnps adorns the Arizona desert. #FindYourPark #NPS100."

Williams also posted a video panorama of the park https://twitter.com/Astro_Jeff/status/768491762079838208 created from images taken on the orbiting laboratory: "Grand indeed @grandcanyonnps. Even from space it took 13 pictures to capture all 277 miles."

Image Gallery: Space Station View of U.S. National Parks http://www.nasa.gov/content/space-station-view-of-us-national-parks
Video: NASA Astronaut Jeff Williams Celebrates the U.S. National Park Service Centennial From Space

Image Credit: NASA
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Re: The Photography Thread

Postby Buc2 » Thu Jan 19, 2017 10:28 am

Take a moment to gaze upon the haunting photo below, which SpaceX published to its Flickr account on Wednesday.

It shows the lower half of the Falcon 9 rocket, also called a booster or first stage, moments before sticking a perfect landing on the (comically named) "Just Read the Instructions" droneship in the Pacific Ocean.

Sharp, backlit shadows — cast by sunlight striking the booster's landing struts — cut through the noxious fog of rocket exhaust, perfectly and accidentally lining up with the ship's circular "bullseye" target:
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falcon 9 rocket booster landing drone ship spacex flickr 31579784413_83aeac560a_o
(SpaceX/Flickr (public domain))
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Don't tread on me
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Re: The Photography Thread

Postby IronDog » Mon Mar 13, 2017 1:21 pm

So, at least now we know where Darth Vader has been hiding himself

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The Big One
Mimas' gigantic crater Herschel lies near the moon's limb in this Cassini view.

A big enough impact could potentially break up a moon. Luckily for Mimas, whatever created Herschel was not quite big enough to cause that level of disruption.

When large impacts happen, they deliver tremendous amounts of energy -- sometimes enough to cause global destruction. Even impacts that are not catastrophic can leave enormous, near-permanent scars on bodies like Mimas (246 miles or 396 kilometers across).

This view looks toward the anti-Saturn hemisphere of Mimas. North on Mimas is up and rotated 32 degrees to the left. The image was taken in visible light with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on Nov. 19, 2016.

The view was acquired at a distance of approximately 53,000 miles (85,000 kilometers) from Mimas. Image scale is 1,677 feet (511 meters) per pixel.

The Cassini mission is a cooperative project of NASA, ESA (the European Space Agency) and the Italian Space Agency. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the mission for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington. The Cassini orbiter and its two onboard cameras were designed, developed and assembled at JPL. The imaging operations center is based at the Space Science Institute in Boulder, Colorado.

The Cassini mission is a cooperative project of NASA, ESA (the European Space Agency) and the Italian Space Agency. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the mission for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington. The Cassini orbiter and its two onboard cameras were designed, developed and assembled at JPL. The imaging operations center is based at the Space Science Institute in Boulder, Colorado.

For more information about the Cassini-Huygens mission visit https://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov and http://www.nasa.gov/cassini . The Cassini imaging team homepage is at http://ciclops.org .

Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute
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Re: The Photography Thread

Postby Caradoc » Fri Mar 17, 2017 10:59 pm

IronDog wrote:So, at least now we know where Darth Vader has been hiding himself



If you were played by Hayden Christensen you'd go into hiding too. Talk about an epic villain being completely emasculated...
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Re: The Photography Thread

Postby IronDog » Fri Jul 14, 2017 10:59 am

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NASA astronaut Jack Fischer photographed the SpaceX Dragon capsule as it reentered Earth's atmosphere before splashing down in the Pacific Ocean https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacex/2017/07/03/dragon-splashes-down-to-complete-resupply-mission/ west of Baja California at 8:12 a.m. EDT, July 3, 2017. Fischer commented, "Beautiful expanse of stars-but the “long” orange one is SpaceX-11 reentering! Congrats team for a successful splashdown & great mission!" https://twitter.com/Astro2fish/status/881854457419407360

A variety of technological and biological studies conducted on the International Space Station are returning in Dragon. The Fruit Fly Lab-02 https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/station/research/experiments/1919.html experiment seeks to better understand the effects of prolonged exposure to microgravity on the heart. Samples from the Systemic Therapy of NELL-1 https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/station/research/experiments/2283.html for osteoporosis will return as part of an investigation using rodents as models to test a new drug that can both rebuild bone and block further bone loss, improving crew health. The Cardiac Stem Cells https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/station/research/experiments/2436.html experiment investigated how microgravity affects stem cells and the factors that govern stem cell activity.

The Dragon spacecraft launched June 3 on a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket from historic Launch Complex 39A at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, and arrived at the station June 5.

Image Credit: NASA
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